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Curriculum

In the Upper School division of Delaware County Christian School, we seek to live out our core values in all we do and say. We strive for excellence in every area, beginning with our college preparatory curriculum and continuing with our co-curricular programs. Our Upper School academic program is divided into two "schools":

  1. The School of Liberal Arts (SLA); and
  2. The Schools for Applied and Innovative Learning (SAIL)

DC's liberal arts approach to learning allows students to think deeply and broadly; SAIL allows them to take action, develop solutions, and create meaningful products. This combination of liberal arts studies and applied and innovative learning epitomizes our core value of scholarship.

SLA

Nimbleness, continuous learning, and the ability to transform ideas into action are critical in this fast-moving world. In light of this reality, we believe in the importance of laying a solid foundation in a liberal arts education. The liberal arts is the broad course of study that typically includes English, history, foreign language, math science, art, music, and literature - including the Bible. It is here that we house our 15 Advanced Placement (AP) courses and more than 25 honors courses. A course of learning in these disciplines enables students to gain knowledge, to think in a variety of ways, and to allow many perspectives to inform action.

Liberal arts learning is the core of learning that unlocks and informs work in more specialized areas of inquiry - ultimately enabling individuals to be innovative, because in approaching problems to which they are seeking solutions, they can bring to bear multifaceted thinking.

Upper School students take classes in the School of Liberal Arts four-and-a-half days per week.

Upper School SLA Course Descriptions

Bible Course Descriptions

Bible

ARCHE - Bible 9 - see Humanities

Christian Doctrine (Required 10th grade course, 1 credit)  - Christian Doctrine is a full-year course designed to provide students with a foundational knowledge of the major doctrines of the Christian faith. After a brief introduction, students will study the seven primary areas of Christian doctrine. Each student will write a Statement of Faith expressing his or her own beliefs concerning the doctrines covered in class, with a special emphasis on how the student's beliefs relate to how he or she is living. The class not only seeks to instill the concepts and vocabulary of biblical doctrine but to help students to see that the story of Scripture has been progressively unfolded in history, and demands that we think and live in a particular way that is governed by God's Word. The desired outcome is for students to formulate and strengthen a Christian worldview, both for life now and as they prepare for the challenges of college and careers in the near future.

Studies in Pentateuch and Romans (Required 11th grade course, 1 credit) - This course is designed to develop a working understanding of the first five books of the Bible and Paul's Epistle to the Romans, both of which are foundational to an understanding of Biblical Redemptive History. The content and form of the Pentateuch make a proper understanding of it foundational for a right understanding of Scripture at large; students will study each of the five books in their own right while also examining how each book fits within and interacts with the remainder of the Pentateuch, the Old Testament, and the entire Bible. The book of Romans unwraps the gospel and its power to change sinners. It is Paul's most structured presentation of the content and impact of the gospel in people's lives. During class students will read the book several times, memorizing several key passages from the book, and engage in discussions that span the argument of the book.

Apologetics and Christian Thought (ACT) (Required 12th grade course, 1 credit) - Apologetics and Christian Thought (ACT) is a required Bible course for seniors designed to equip students to think about the religious or "faith-based" nature of all knowledge or truth claims, and how the biblical gospel of the Lord Jesus can and should be both defended and commended. The course will begin by examining concepts that are foundational to debating intellectual issues while developing a working definition of apologetics. Students will receive an introduction to Christian Thought as well as explore the major trajectories within the western development of philosophy. Students will study the Christian faith in relation to contemporary society and its competing truth claims from the basis of the "worldview" concept. This class will further develop the critical thinking tools DC seniors have received during their education at DC to evaluate past, present, and future ideas that students will face, and currently are facing, in the world. Students will be challenged to incorporate all of their learning at DC as they recognize God's integration in every facet of life. 

English Course Descriptions

English

ARCHE - English 9 - see Humanities

English 10 (Required, 1 credit, Honors and College Prep) - This foundational English class builds on the ninth grade curriculum, preparing students for an in-depth look at literature and composition in eleventh and twelfth grades. The class stresses expository writing skills, themes in literature, basic public speaking skills, vocabulary development, and research. This class also includes an overview of British literature, including Beowolf, MacBeth, Twelfth Night, Cry the Beloved Country, A Tale of Two Cities, and poetry. In order to take Honors English, students must be recommended by their current 9th grade teacher, have at least an average of 88 in Honors English 9 or at least an average of 93 in their current College Prep English 9 at the time of class registration, and have shown a consistent work ethic and above average writing ability.

English 11 (Required, 1 credit, Honors and College Prep) - Junior English introduces the student to the American experience as reflected in literature from colonial to modern times. Students will be required to engage in independent reading and to respond to their reading clearly and specifically in both written and oral forms. A term paper is also required. Readings include The Crucible, The Scarlet Letter, The Great Gatsby, as well as the writings of other American writers who have stood the test of time.  Students who wish to take the Honors class will be asked to complete more outside work for class, and must be approved by the department head. For students to be considered for Honors, they must have either earned a 93 average in their previous College Prep English class by the end of the first semester, or maintained an 88 average in their previous Honors English class by the end of the first semester. Standardized test scores will also be considered, along with teacher recommendation.

AP English Language and Composition (11th grade Elective in place of English 11, 1 credit) - Students in this college-level course will read and analyze a broad range of non-fiction texts, evaluating the rhetorical strategies authors employ, as well as developing strategies to address synthesis questions. Students will also read works from American fiction writers studied in historical context. Readings will be varied, but will include such writers as Maya Angelou, Frederick Douglass, Jonathan Edwards, R.C. Sproul, Benjamin Franklin, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Mark Twain, and Robert Frost. This course heavily emphasizes skill and practice in writing, including the required term paper.

All students in this course are required to take the AP Exam in May at their own expense ($100). In addition to receiving a recommendation from their current 10th grade English teacher, students must have at least an average of 93 in Honors English 10 at the time of class registration, have displayed a consistent work ethic, and possess above average analytical and writing skills. Students in this course may opt to receive dual credit for this course--high school credit and 3 college credits from Cairn University. Enrollment and cost information for the dual credit option will be given to students on the first day of class.

English 12 (Required, 1 credit) - Senior English is a survey of classic British literature from Shakespeare through modern times. Students will be asked to analyze English literature through class discussion, critical essays, and a term paper. The course will also focus on college writing; students will write a variety of essays to prepare them for college courses and will review grammar and vocabulary to help them improve their writing. Readings include Henry V, Hamlet, Tale of Two Cities, Frankenstein, Heart of Darkness, Brave New World, The Question of God, as well as various poems and short stories.

AP English Literature (12th Elective in place of English 12, 1 credit) - AP English is a college-level course designed to prepare the student for the College Board Advanced Placement Examination in English Literature and Composition.  Extensive outside reading, analytical writing, and literary research are required. Reading selections will include such writers as Huxley, Dostoevsky, Dante, Shakespeare, Shelley, Austen, and Chesterton. Students will present written and oral focused and critical analyses of literature. Writing assignments will include statements, paragraphs, timed writings, formal essays and a research paper.

All students in this course are required to take the AP exam in May at their own expense ($100). Factors which determine student enrollment include a recommendation from the student's present Junior English teacher, grade average, an evaluation of a previous student essay, and approval by the AP teacher. Students must have an A average in their Junior English class at the time of class registration, have shown a serious and consistent work ethic, and have above average writing skills.
 

History Course Descripitions

History

ARCHE - History 9 - see Humanities

World History II (Required, 1 credit, Honors and College Prep) - This 10th grade course is designed to acquaint the student with the major environmental, cultural, political, economic, and social developments of humankind since 1450. The course is organized around three time periods: 1450-1750, 1750-1900, 1900-present. Some of the skills most emphasized in this course are discerning cause-effect relationships between historical events, interpreting historical documents, and debating historical issues using historical sources, and engaging in group discussion concerning the deeper questions of history. Students who wish to take the Honors class will be given more leadership opportunities within class, be asked to complete more outside work for class, and must be approved by the department.

AP World History (10th Elective in place of Honors or College Prep World History II, 1 credit) - This AP World History course will guide motivated students through the steps of the historian, analyzing historical events and types of historical evidence. The course highlights the nature of changes and comparisons on the global scene, with Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe and Oceania all represented. The purpose of this course is to develop greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contacts, in interaction with different types of human societies. This understanding is advanced through a combination of selective factual knowledge and appropriate analytical skills. Key to the course is evaluating these understandings within a biblical perspective of history. Periodization and specific themes provide the structure for the course. Everyone enrolled in the class is required to take the College Board Advanced Placement World History Examination in May at their own expense ($100). Students need departmental approval to enroll.

United States History (Required, 1 credit, Honors and College Prep) - This 11th grade course will explore the history of the United States from the end of the Revolutionary War to the present. Major topics include the development of the United States Constitution and cultural and political changes in the 19th century. While one quarter of the course will be set aside for investigating America's origins, the majority of the course will focus on the events of the 20th and 21st centuries. In the 20th century, major world events and momentous political and cultural changes will be explored. The Cold War will be an area of special focus as students investigate two dominant world views as they competed for world hegemony. Reading, critical thinking, and discussion will be integral components of the course as students develop an appreciation for America's heritage. Students who wish to take the Honors class will be given more leadership opportunities within class, be asked to complete more outside work for class, and must be approved by the department.

AP United States History (11th Elective in place of Honors or College Prep US History, 1 credit) - Major economic, social, political and religious themes from 1492-2008 are covered in this course to prepare the 11th grade student to take the national exam in early May. Students in the class are asked to do substantial reading from both primary and secondary sources. Speaking, writing and thinking skills are encouraged through class debates/discussions, reaction papers, and book reviews on major historical problems. In the preceding summer, students read textbook chapters and books to prepare for the class. Everyone enrolled in the class is required to take the College Board Advanced Placement United States History Examination in May at their own expense ($100). Students need departmental approval to enter.

American Government / Economics (Required, 1 credit, Honors and College Prep) - This 12th grade course is designed to provide students with an overview of the key ideas and concepts that have shaped the American political experience and to introduce the major sources of American constitutional development from the colonial period to the present. We will also be studying various economic disciplines stressing the philosophical foundations associated with free market economics. The desire is for the student to become better equipped to understand, evaluate, and participate in the American political process. Students who wish to take the Honors class will be given more leadership opportunities within class, be asked to complete more outside work for class, and must be approved by the department.

AP European History (12th Elective in place of Honors or College Prep American Government/Economics, 1 credit) - From the late Middle Ages to the fall of the Berlin Wall, this course covers the major social, economic, political, and religious dimensions of modern Europe. Students are required to do substantial reading, writing, and discussing through book reviews and oral presentations. Students are required to read three books the preceding summer. Everyone enrolled in the class is required to take the College Board Advanced Placement European History Examination in May at their own expense ($100). Students need departmental approval to enter.

AP United States Government and Politics (12th Elective in place of Honors or College Prep American Government/Economics, 1 credit) – This is a one-year course offered to highly motivated seniors and is designed to give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. The course includes the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. government and politics, the analysis of specific examples, and familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. government and politics. The course is also designed to acquaint the student with the biblical perspective of government: the obedience that scripture requires of citizens to rulers, but also the responsibilities incumbent upon the Christian to pray for and support that government. Students will be required to do analysis papers, discuss and debate topics and read supplemental topics on relevant issues. Everyone enrolled in the class is required to take the College Board Advanced Placement United States Government and Politics Examination in May at their own expense ($100). Students need departmental approval to enter.

Humanities Course Descriptions

Humanities

Arche (Required 9th grade course, 3 credits, Honors and College Prep) - Arche is a foundational freshman course that integrates the following curricula: History, Bible and English. Arche, a Greek word for beginnings, studies the formation of societies from the ancient world until the 1500's. The course will establish foundational skills in expository writing, Christian hermeneutics, and literary textual analysis. It will do so by cohesively aligning the curriculums chronologically or thematically. The understanding that God's truth is evident and relevant in all disciplines will help establish a Biblical worldview. Students will be challenged to compare various narratives and philosophies with the truth of Biblical Christianity. They will also develop and apply analytical skills to the Canonical Gospels, historical documents, and literary texts. Ultimately, the goal is that the student will grow in understanding of truth so that he/she is able to actively engage such texts, rightly discern their meaning, and properly apply them to his/her life. Students who wish to take the Honors class will be asked to complete more outside work for class, have different assessments, and must be recommended by their 8th grade teachers. In order to be recommended for Honors ARCHE, students must maintain a combined average of 92% or higher in English, Bible and History, and demonstrate consistently strong academic performance.

Mathematics Course Descriptions

Mathematics

Click here to see the Calculator Guide.

(All students are required to be enrolled in a full year of mathematics except for seniors in the highest track who have completed Honors Calculus and Honors Probability/Statistics. See the Mathematics Course Flow Chart.)

Algebra I (1 credit) - Algebra I forms the foundation for the study of mathematics in high school. Students develop an understanding of fundamental algebraic properties and constantly review the operations of the real number system. Students develop good problem solving and communication skills as they learn to separate a difficult problem into manageable steps using clear mathematical language and notation. The first semester is a thorough treatment of linear functions, while in the second semester quadratic and other polynomials are addressed. Computers and calculators are used as tools to explore the world of mathematics. Required calculator: Texas Instruments TI- 30XS MultiView scientific calculator.

Geometry (1 credit) - The focus of geometry is the properties of plane geometric figures: triangles, circles, parallelograms, and other polygons. Formulas for areas and volumes of geometric figures are developed and applied. Emphasis is placed on the discovery of geometric relationships in the physical world and their use in practical situations. Students will use geometry computer software and their TI-Nspire calculators as an aid in discovering and conjecturing about geometric relationships. Though formal proof is not emphasized, students will learn to write simple proofs involving congruence and similarity. An introduction to geometric probability is also included. Enrolling students must have completed Algebra I. Required calculator: Texas Instruments TI-Nspire (touchpad or CX version not TI-Nspire CAS).

Honors Geometry (1 credit) - The Honors Geometry course provides a rigorous study of Euclidean and non-Euclidean Geometries using algebra and logic. The course emphasizes deductive reasoning and proof, as well as coordinate geometry and algebraic verification. After learning the basic definitions, students study parallel lines, triangles, polygons, circles, and polyhedra. Also included are studies in congruence, similarity, area and volume, probability, and  constructions. Students will use geometry computer software and their TI-Nspire calculators as an aid in discovering and conjecturing about geometric relationships. Enrolling students should have completed Honors Algebra I with an average of at least 80%. Required calculator: Texas Instruments TI-Nspire (touchpad or CX version not TI-Nspire CAS).

Algebra II (1 credit) - This second year course in algebra reviews major concepts from Algebra I including solving systems of linear equations and inequalities. Students are introduced to methods for solving absolute value equations and inequalities. Additional topics include quadratics, factoring, radical expressions, and solving polynomial equations over the field of complex numbers. The course concludes with an introduction to trigonometry. Graphing and applications are stressed throughout. Graphing calculators and computers are used to introduce, explore, and apply mathematics. Enrolling students must have completed Algebra I and Geometry. Required calculator: Texas Instruments TI-Nspire (touchpad or CX version not TI-Nspire CAS).

Honors Algebra II (1 credit) - After a brief review of the first year algebra concepts, the course moves to the study of more advanced topics that include quadratics, polynomials, matrices, exponential and logarithmic functions, conic sections, and an introduction to trigonometry. Emphasis is placed on understanding algebraic concepts from a graphical approach. Enrolling students should have completed Honors Geometry with an average of at least an 80%. Required calculator: Texas Instruments TI-Inspire (touchpad or CX version not TI-Inspire CAS).

Algebra III/Trigonometry (1 credit) - This final year of algebra focuses on the study of functions: polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric. Additional topics include conic sections, sequences and series, and matrices. Emphasis is placed on real-world applications and problem solving. Enrolling students must have completed Algebra II. Required calculator: Texas Instruments TI-Nspire (touchpad or CX version not TI-Nspire CAS).

Probability and Statistics (0.5 credit, 1 semester) This course will introduce students to sampling techniques, experiment design, graphical displays of data, measures of center and spread, linear modeling, counting, and probability. Students will make frequent use of TI-Nspire calculators and computers. Real world data will be used extensively to develop statistical literacy, critical thinking, and a Christian perspective on both statistics in the media and God’s role in random phenomena. Enrolling students must have completed either Algebra III/Trigonometry or Algebra II. Required calculator: Texas Instruments TI-Nspire (touchpad or CX version not TI-Nspire CAS).

Finance (0.5 credit, 1 semester) - This one-semester course begins with a brief examination of the purpose and use of money from a biblical perspective. The stock market, banking, insurance, government spending, and forms of taxation will be discussed from both a mathematical and scriptural viewpoint. The mathematics of personal finances, including compound interest, credit cards, insurance, savings and retirement accounts, will conclude the course. Students will make use of graphing calculators, spreadsheets, and the internet to explore these topics. Enrolling students must have completed either Algebra III/Trigonometry or Algebra II. Required calculator: Texas Instruments TINspire or TI-Nspire CAS (touchpad or CX version).

Honors Precalculus (1 credit) - This course is an overall study of functions: algebraic, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic. Emphasis is placed on discovering the similarities and differences among functions and using functions to solve real world problems. Other topics include trigonometric identities and equations, complex numbers and polar coordinates, sequences and series, and vectors. Enrolling students should have completed Honors Algebra II with an average of at least 80%. Required calculator: Texas Instruments TI-Nspire (touchpad or CX version not TI-Nspire CAS).

Honors Probability and Statistics (0.5 credit, 1 semester) - In this course students will make frequent use of graphing calculators and computers to study statistical output and methods of data analysis. Main topics will include sampling techniques, graphical displays of data, measures of central tendency, linear modeling, counting methods, simulations, and probability. Real-world data will be used extensively to develop statistical literacy, critical thinking, and a Christian perspective on both statistics in the media and God’s role in "random" phenomena. Enrolling students must have completed Precalculus. Required calculator: Texas Instruments TI-Nspire or TI-Nspire CAS (touchpad or CX version).

Honors Calculus (0.5 credit, 1 semester) - Students who wish to take AP Calculus their senior year must be enrolled in this honors course during their junior year. However, other students who are not planning on taking AP Calculus are also welcome to enroll in this course. Students are introduced to the concept of limit and use limits to understand functional behavior. They explore the concept of the derivative, with applications to curve sketching, finding maximum and minimum values, and rates of change. Each concept is presented numerically, graphically, and analytically to give the student the broadest possible understanding. Students are required to do independent laboratory projects using computer software available in the school computer laboratory. Enrolling students should have completed Precalculus with an average of at least 80%. Required calculator: Texas Instruments TI-Nspire CAS (touchpad or CX version).

Calculus (1 credit) - This full year course begins with a brief review of polynomials, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions, while integrating a  discussion of limits, derivatives, and integrals. Derivatives and integrals are demonstrated in practical applications and real-world problems. This course is open to students who have completed Honors Precalculus. Required calculator: Texas Instruments TI-Nspire (touchpad or CX version not TI-Nspire CAS).

AP Statistics (1 credit) - This full year course follows the outline for the Advanced Placement course in statistics as published by the College Board. Students will make extensive use of technology to explore methods for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. The course highlights four themes of statistics: exploration of data by describing patterns, sampling and experiment design through conducting studies, predicting patterns using probability and simulation, and statistical inference by estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses. A Christian perspective on statistics in the media, ethical experiment design, random phenomena, and the usefulness of statistical inference is articulated throughout the course. All students in this course are required to take the Advanced Placement Statistics Examination in May at their own expense ($100). Enrolling students should have completed Precalculus with an average of at least 80%. Required calculator: Texas Instruments TI-NSpire or TI-Nspire CAS (touchpad or CX version). Students may opt to receive dual credit for this course--high school credit and 3 college credits from Cairn University. Enrollment and cost information for the dual credit option will be given to students on the first day of class.

AP Calculus BC (1 credit) - The course syllabus follows the outline for the Advanced Placement course in Calculus BC as published by the College Board. Each concept is presented numerically, graphically, and analytically to give the student the broadest possible understanding. The course begins by developing the concept of the integral and applying it to the calculation of areas, total and average values, work, and volumes of solids. Both differential and integral concepts are applied to parametric functions, polar functions, and vectors. Differential equations are solved using Euler's Method and slope fields. The convergence and divergence of a wide variety of series is explored. Students are required to do independent laboratory projects using computer software. All students in this course are required to take the Advanced Placement Calculus BC Examination in May at their own expense ($100). Enrolling students should have completed the Honors Calculus course with an average of at least 80%. Required calculator: Texas Instruments TI-Nspire CAS (touchpad or CX version). Students may opt to receive dual credit for this course--high school credit and 3 college credits from Cairn University. Enrollment and cost information for the dual credit option will be given to students on the first day of class.

Science Course Descriptions

Science

All students must successfully complete 3 credits of science including Biology and Chemistry to earn a diploma from Delaware County Christian School.

Biology (1 credit) - This course examines molecules, genetics, cells, and organ systems of living creatures, and their relationships with each other and their surroundings in the context of understanding creation and a scientific approach to learning with a biblical worldview. This course includes a lab component, including dissection of animals, study of cells, and use of the scientific method. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Physical Science or equivalent middle school science course.

Honors Biology (1 credit) - This course examines molecules, genetics, cells, and organ systems of living creatures, and their relationships with each other and their surroundings in the context of understanding creation and a scientific approach to learning with a biblical worldview. This course includes a lab component, including dissection of animals, study of cells, and use of the scientific method. Prerequisites: Minimum average of 88% in previous science course; demonstrated academic performance, responsibility, and motivation to learn in current science courses; departmental approval.

Chemistry (1 credit) - This full-year high school chemistry course is designed to show students how chemical principles and concepts are developed and operate. Among the topics covered are atomic structure, chemical bonding, and the chemical behavior of solids, liquids, and gases. The course is centered around regular laboratory work. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology and Algebra I.

Honors Chemistry (1 credit) - This full-year high school chemistry course is designed to show students how chemical principles and concepts are developed and operate. Among the topics covered are atomic structure, chemical bonding, and the chemical behavior of solids, liquids, and gases. The course is centered around regular laboratory work and will progress more rapidly than the regular Chemistry course and with greater depth. This course is designed for students who enjoy science and learn easily from conceptual explanations. This course is an appropriate first chemistry course for students intending to take advanced courses in chemistry and/or biology. Prerequisites: Minimum average of 90% in regular Biology or 86% in Honors Biology; Minimum average of 86% in Algebra I; demonstrated academic performance, responsibility, and motivation to learn in current math and science courses; departmental approval.

Elective Courses (open to Juniors and Seniors)

Physics (1 credit) - This class will explore the application of the physical laws and principles that govern the natural world, such as the physics behind motion, forces, and energy. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology, Chemistry, and Algebra II.

Honors Physics (1 credit) - This course considers how matter and energy interact and is designed for students who learn best from conceptual (abstract) explanations and examples/applications from life as well as using mathematical problem solving to understand how objects behave. Students will learn how to apply principles of kinematics, forces, momentum, and conservation of energy. Prerequisites: Minimum average of 86% in an honors science course; Minimum average of 86% in Algebra II; demonstrated academic performance, responsibility, and motivation to learn in current math and science courses; departmental approval.

AP Physics 1 (1 credit) - This is a rigorous introductory physics course, equivalent to the first semester of a first year Algebra-based college Physics course. Students will learn how to apply principles of kinematics, forces, momentum, conservation of energy, electrostatics, and basic circuits. The College Board requires 25% of all AP science courses to be "hands-on," therefore students will have frequent lab sessions. One SAIL trimester course will be devoted to lab. Visit the College Board for further information about this course: http://bit.ly/1QfBE0j. Students are required to take the College Board Advanced Placement Physics (1) Examination in May at their own expense ($100). There will also be an assignment to complete during the summer. Prerequisites: Minimum average of 86% in an Honors Science or 90% in regular Science course; Minimum average of 86% in Algebra II; demonstrated academic performance, responsibility, and motivation to learn in current math and science courses; departmental approval.

AP Physics 2 (1 credit) - This is a rigorous course, equivalent to the second semester of a first year Algebra-based college Physics course. The class will explore topics related to electricity, magnetism, thermodynamics, fluid dynamics, optics, and modern Physics. The College Board requires 25% of all AP science courses to be "hands-on," therefore students will have frequent lab sessions.  One SAIL trimester course will be devoted to lab. Visit the College Board for further information about this course: http://bit.ly/1QeE5g4. Students are required to take the College Board Advanced Placement Physics (2) Examination in May at their own expense ($100). There will also be an assignment to complete during the summer. Prerequisites: Minimum average of 86% in an AP Physics 1 and Precalculus; demonstrated academic performance, responsibility, and motivation to learn in current math and science courses; departmental approval.

Honors Anatomy and Physiology (1 credit) - This discussion-based course emphasizes homeostasis and the relationship between structure (anatomy) and function (physiology) at all levels of organization. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of the workings of the following systems: integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive. Prerequisites: Minimum average of 90% in regular Biology or 86% in Honors Biology; Minimum average of 86% in Honors Chemistry or 90% in regular Chemistry; demonstrated academic performance, responsibility, and motivation to learn in current science course; departmental approval.

AP Biology (1 credit) - The AP Biology course is designed as the equivalent of a full-year college level introductory biology course organized around central themes: molecules and cells, heredity and evolution, and organisms and populations. There is a strong emphasis on descriptive writing and development of lab skills. The College Board requires 25% of all AP science courses to be "hands-on," therefore students will have frequent lab sessions. One SAIL trimester course will be devoted to lab.  Visit the College Board for further information about this course:  http://bit.ly/1oII2Dd. Students are required to take the College Board Advanced Placement Biology Examination in May at their own expense ($100). There will also be an assignment to complete during the summer. Prerequisites: Minimum average of 86% in Honors Chemistry or Honors Biology or 90% in regular Chemistry or Biology; demonstrated academic performance, responsibility, and motivation to learn in current science courses; departmental approval.

AP Chemistry (1 credit) - The AP Chemistry course is designed as the equivalent of a college level introductory chemistry class organized around central themes and science practices. There is a strong emphasis on descriptive writing, problem solving and development of lab skills. The College Board requires 25% of all AP science courses to be "hands-on," therefore students will have frequent lab sessions. One SAIL trimester course will be devoted to lab. Visit the College Board for further information about this course:  http://bit.ly/1Umpswp. Students are required to take the College Board Advanced Placement Chemistry Examination in May at their own expense ($100). There will also be an assignment to complete during the summer. Prerequisites: Minimum average of 90% in regular Chemistry or 86% in Honors Chemistry; Minimum average of 86% in Algebra II; demonstrated academic performance, responsibility, and motivation to learn in current math and science courses; departmental approval.

Introduction to Forensics (0.5 credit, one semester) - This course is designed as a capstone course for students who desire an applied, hands-on approach to science. Students will apply their basic knowledge of biology, chemistry and physics to crime scene investigation. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology and Chemistry.

Topics in Earth and Environment (0.5 credit, one semester) - This course is the study of science as it relates to current earth and environment issues in the context of a biblical worldview. Foundations of earth science and ecology will be developed followed up by an exploration of various contemporary topics such as fracking, climate change, and renewable energy among others. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology and Chemistry.
 

World Language Course Descriptions

World Languages

(Students are required to complete Level III of one Modern Language during high school.)

Spanish I (Honors and College Prep, 1 credit) - In this beginning course, students in grades nine through twelve start to build a foundation of the Spanish language through developing skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. These skills are developed through the study of the Spanish alphabet, basic vocabulary and grammar, various cultural topics, and geography. 

Spanish II (Honors and College Prep, 1 credit) - Ninth through twelfth grade students continue grammar study through reading, writing, listening and speaking. Students will learn to use present and past tenses as well as commands. Honors level will learn future and conditional tenses. Through the exploration of short articles, dialogues, and culture readings, students will continue the development of their second language abilities. Prerequisite: Spanish I

Spanish III (Honors and College Prep, 1 credit) - Tenth through twelfth grade students continue to expand upon both the grammatical elements and the vocabulary from previous years. Students are expected to use Spanish almost exclusively in class through activities that involve reading, writing, listening, and speaking in Spanish. Many verb tenses are introduced or developed further in this course, with a focus on the irregular preterite and the subjunctive. Cultural explorations of various Spanish-speaking countries and customs continues. Prerequisite: Spanish II

Spanish IV (Honors and College Prep, 1 credit) - Eleventh and twelfth grade students continue to develop their ease with the language by expanding their vocabulary and a general review of grammar concepts learned in previous courses. The class is taught exclusively in Spanish and students are expected to use this target language to communicate during class. There is an emphasis on clarity in speaking and writing, while also aiming to develop a high degree of comprehension when reading and listening. Students study short stories and poems by well-known Spanish-speaking authors. The cultural focus is on artists from various parts of the Spanish speaking world. Prerequisite: Spanish III

AP Spanish (1 credit) - This course centers on critical thinking and the synthesis of all four skill areas (speaking, writing, reading, and listening) at an advanced level. Students will review advanced grammar principles and continue building their vocabulary as well as mastering a variety of idiomatic expressions. The AP student will need to be independently motivated beyond regular classroom assignments, which require extra listening comprehension exercises online as well as recordings of spoken responses. Everyone enrolled in the class is required to take the College Board Advanced Placement Spanish Examination in May at their own expense ($100). The instructor's permission is required prior to registration for this course. Students are expected to participate in an immersion weekend. Students may opt to receive dual credit for this course--high school credit and 3 college credits from Cairn University. Enrollment and cost information for the dual credit option will be given to students in the first week of class. Prerequisite: Spanish IV Honors

German III (Honors and College Prep, 1 credit) - German III expands upon both the grammatical elements and the level of vocabulary from previous years. Students are expected to speak in German. They will write and read more sophisticated pieces and engage in more in-depth conversations and discussions. Students will complete longer listening assignments. Each unit incorporates cultural information on various cities and German life. Prerequisite: German II

German IV Honors (1 credit) - German IV is designed to increase confidence in writing and speaking German, in understanding spoken and written German, and to expose students to idiomatic expressions. Students will systematically review grammar and will study the more complex points of grammar. Students are expected to speak in German and will increase their oral fluency through discussions, presentations, and more in-depth oral responses. Film and interactive activities on the internet and provided with their text will supplement the text. Prerequisite: German III

German V Honors (1 credit) - This class will succeed German IV as an option for students who are committed to pursuing the German language without committing to another AP class. In this class students will write and speak at a a sophisticated level and cover more in-depth grammatical studies. They will engage in cultural and historical learning from films, novels, and various essays and will interact with these medium in a higher level than previously employed. Students will be expected to speak exclusively in German. Prerequisite: German IV Honors

AP German (1 credit) - AP German is a more in-depth German course which increases the emphasis on listening comprehension, writing skills and speaking skills. Students read a selection of German literary works and news articles. Students master a variety of idiomatic expressions. Everyone enrolled in the class is required to take the College Board Advanced Placement German Examination in May at their own expense ($100). As the AP College Board examination adjusts its requirements, this course will address those changes. Prerequisite: German IV Honors

Mandarin II (Honors and College Prep, 1 credit) - This course continues to build on Mandarin I to develop students' communication skills at a more advanced level, including listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students continue to learn about Chinese culture and history. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, interactive cultural presentations and task-based activities to reinforce acquisition of vocabulary and grammar concepts. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Pinyin is still presented with characters to enhance listening and reading comprehension. Simplified characters are taught. Prerequisite: Mandarin I

Mandarin III (Honors and College Prep, 1 credit) – The third year Mandarin course enables students to increase their proficiency in the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing through various authentic texts, media, culture and language contexts. They will further expand their understanding of the Chinese culture, extend their skills in grammar, and be encouraged to increase their communicative skills. Students will work toward oral proficiency through conversation, discussion, and oral presentation. Prerequisite: Mandarin II

Mandarin IV (Honors and College Prep, 1 credit) - This course will continue the process of skill development, digging deeper into the language and culture, while still focusing on the primary modes of communication: interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational. This course is conducted mainly in the target language. In addition, students will develop a broader understanding and appreciation for different aspects of Chinese culture. Prerequisite: Mandarin III

AP Chinese Language and Culture (1 credit) - AP Chinese Language and Culture provides students with ongoing and varied opportunities to further develop their proficiencies across the full range of language skills within a cultural frame of reference reflective of the richness of Chinese language and culture. Everyone enrolled in this class is required to take the College Board Advanced Placement Chinese Language and Culture Examination in May at their own expenses ($100). Instructor's permission required prior to registration for this course. Prerequisite: Mandarin IV Honors
 

Electives for School of Liberal Arts

Electives

Mathematics Electives
AP Computer Science Principles
(1 credit) - This full year elective math course follows the outline for the Advanced Placement course in Computer Science Principles as published by the College Board. This is a multidisciplinary course that introduces the foundations of computer science with a focus on how computers work and their global impact. In this course students will learn to analyze data sets to draw conclusions from trends and be introduced to the creative aspects of programming, abstractions, algorithms, the internet, cybersecurity, and computing impacts. Students will be expected to create multiple computational artifacts organized around seven big ideas; creativity, abstraction, data and information, algorithms, programming, the internet, and global impact. Throughout the course, students will learn multiple programming languages and work individually and collaboratively to solve problems and will discuss and write about the impacts these solutions could have on their community, society, and the world. All students in this course are required to complete an Exploration Task, Performance Task, and take the Advanced Placement Computer Science Principles Examination in May at their own expense ($100). Enrolling students must have completed Algebra II.

Mathematics Club (0.5 or 0.25 credit, full year) - The Mathematics Club is open to students in grades 9 through 12 who enjoy mathematics and are interested in improving their problem solving skills. Students will work individually, and in groups, on problems at many different levels of difficulty. Time will also be spent preparing for mathematics competitions. Club members will participate in the Pennsylvania Mathematics League, the local It's Mathematics League, and the American Mathematics Competition. The local meets are held after school 6 times during the school year. Club members are expected to attend unless they have an unavoidable conflict.

History/Social Studies Elective
AP Psychology
(0.5 credit, semester) - AP Psychology seeks to introduce students to the systematic and scientific principles of modern and historic study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings. Students will be exposed to the psychological concepts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within this science. Students will also discuss the material in light of what God's Word reveals to us about what it means to be a person created in God's image. This semester course in psychology will be supplemented by the required Questions in Psychology SAIL course and is intended to prepare students to more intelligently engage the world around them. While students who enroll in the AP Psychology course must also take Questions in Psychology in the spring semester, those who have previously taken this SAIL course need only take the AP Psychology course in the fall semester. Everyone enrolled in the class is required to take the College Board Advanced Placement Psychology Examination in May at their own expense ($100). Students need departmental approval to enter.

Fine Arts - Writing/Publishing Electives
Yearbook (1 credit, full year) - This course produces the school's yearbook, Initium, and offers students numerous opportunities to grow in areas of writing, leadership and service. Students are required to responsibly meet deadlines and utilize the principles of layout, interviewing, and copy writing. Considerable time outside of class will be required to prepare the yearbook for publication.

Journalism (0.5 credit, full year) - This course produces the four annual issues of the school's student newspaper, Knightline. General journalistic principles are taught and applied throughout the year. Students are expected to be responsible in order to meet deadlines, to fulfill article assignments, and to utilize the principles of layout and news writing. Time outside of class may be required to prepare the newspaper for publication. Available for 9th-12th graders.

Creative Writing I (0.25 credit, 1 semester)- Students will learn how to write their own original poetry and fiction through studying outstanding works of each type, interacting with the teacher, and exchanging feedback with fellow students. Each student will develop a portfolio over the course of the semester that will consist of both finished pieces and work in process. Class members will be encouraged to pursue the publication of their finished pieces, both in class and in written publications.

Creative Writing II (0.25 credit, 1 semester) - In this course, students will participate in a workshop-style setting in which they write fiction, poetry, and drama and engage in peer editing with both the teacher and fellow students. Continued emphasis will be placed upon creating a working portfolio, as well as finding opportunities for publication. This course will be offered during the spring semester with enrollment limited to 12-15 eligible students. Prerequisite: Creative Writing I. (Note: Students who successfully complete Creative Writing I in the fall semester will be eligible to take Creative Writing II in the spring semester.)

Fine Arts - Theatre Electives
Theatre Elective
(0.5 credit, full year) - This introductory course is designed to introduce students to the joy of stage acting. Through hands-on exercises the students gain confidence while learning the basic tools of acting in an ensemble atmosphere.

Theatre I (0.5 credit, full year) - In this course students will explore many different aspects of theatre, including radio theatre, character development, Greek Theatre, and much more. Sharpening our knowledge of theatre will be the focus as students will have many opportunities to perform in class to showcase what they have learned.

Theatre II (0.5 credit, full year) - Pre-requisite: at least one drama course and must be an upper-classman. This course teaches students to apply their acting skills to performing texts. The students will learn to prepare and perform monologues and scenes from plays, while also improving their improvisational skills.

Theatre III (0.5 credit, full year) - Pre-requisite: This class is only for seniors who have taken two of the drama classes offered. This challenging course will allow the students to refine their acting skills as they explore acting styles past and present. Text work will include a study of American and British playwrights. The class will culminate in a showcase of their work learned throughout the year for an invited audience.

Fine Arts - Music Electives
Concert Choir
(0.5 credit, full year) - Concert Choir is a performance-based group comprised of students in Grades 9-12. Auditions are held each spring. Concert Choir members should have the technical ability to perform music with accuracy and proper stylization, and basic sight reading ability. Concert Choir has toured the Southeastern US and Canada and performs at school concerts, All-School chapels, choral competitions and festivals.

Concert Band (0.5 credit, full year) - Students in grades 9-12 who play brass, woodwind, or percussion instruments may join the concert band, provided they meet course prerequisites in reading rhythm, making characteristic tone on their instruments, scale knowledge, sight reading ability, and technical facility on their instrument. Audition may be required to determine eligibility and/or placement. Private instruction may be required for remedial students. The band tours in the spring and performs at school concerts, All-School chapels, and adjudicated festivals. Students selecting band must exhibit the ability and desire to learn their assigned parts in rehearsals and through regular at-home practice.

Knight Tones (0.5 credit, full year) - Knight Tones, DC's most elite choral ensemble will continue to pursue choral excellence while delving more deeply into biblical context, history, linguistics, culture and literary study related to their current repertoire. Through research, 'think tanking' and creative practical application, Knight Tones will make informed decisions on stylistic performance practices and musical interpretation. Knight Tones is a full year commitment: One SAIL trimester course will be devoted to Knight Tones and during advisory period another trimester. Admission to this course is by audition only. Knight Tones has toured the Southeastern US, Vienna Germany, Canada, and England.

Fine Arts - Visual Electives
Art Elective
(0.5 credit, full year) - This course is designed to give freshmen experience with basic tools and materials. The emphasis is on processes and techniques. The class includes drawing, painting, sculpture, fibers, and graphic design.

Fine Art I (0.5 credit, full year) - In this course, students are introduced to a wide variety of processes, media and ways of generating ideas. The course covers a broad spectrum including drawing, painting, 3-dimensional work, fibers, graphic design, printmaking and an art appreciation section.

Fine Art II (1 credit, full year) - (Pre-requisite: 9th Art Elective or Fine Art I) This course instills a strong basic vocabulary of techniques, terms, and materials upon which students build their further studies. Basic drawing skills are stressed with emphasis on eye-hand coordination. The curriculum builds towards more conceptual and sophisticated projects that encourage flexible source materials and personal style.

Fine Art III (1 credit, full year) - (Pre-requisite: 2 years of high school art) This program is designed to serve as a transition from a structured program to one which immerses the students in the process of making decisions. The intent is to develop self-discipline and the ability to structure and evaluate the art processes. Students focus on problem-solving in two- and three-dimensional media. Emphasis is placed on the importance of the form and content of the student's work.

Honors Fine Art III (1 credit, full year) - This course is for students with exceptional abilities, motivation, and skills who are recommended by the instructor. Honors includes portfolio preparation.

Computer Graphics I, II, III (0.5 credit or 1 credit, full year) – (Pre-requisite: two years of previous high school art courses and basic computer skills) This course will expose students to 3D animation, architectural design, 3D modeling, visual computer layouts and other computer art experiences. Enrollment is limited.

Miscellaneous Electives
Tech Crew
(0.5 credit, 1 semester) - Tech Crew is open to all students in grades 9 through 12 who enjoy working on a team and desire a leadership role. Students will learn various sound and lighting techniques and provide these services to all three divisions (LS, MS, and US) for various evening and weekend meetings. High profile functions include plays, musicals, chapels, and concerts. Students will be placed in teams and a schedule will be created so that all students are not required to attend every function. Grading will be based on attendance at the functions s/he is assigned, professionalism, leadership, and a willingness to serve. 

Elementary Teacher Aide (0.5 credit, 1 semester) - This elective provides an opportunity for a student to experience serving as an aide in an elementary classroom. Activities include working with individual students, teaching small groups, grading papers and preparing bulletin boards or other teacher-directed tasks. Required assignments include a weekly journal entry and a classroom paper or project. Back to back study halls are necessary to schedule this elective. Final placement is dependent upon an application process, teacher availability and transportation arrangements. For more information, contact Mrs. Puckett (jpuckett@dccs.org).

Hi-Q (0.5 credit, full year) - Hi-Q is an academic quiz team that competes against twenty area Delaware County Schools, both private and public. Criteria for selection to the team include personal interview and faculty recommendation. Summer research and participation in Saturday morning practices (Sept. - March) are required. Spring try-outs are open to rising sophomores, juniors, and seniors; freshmen may try out via advisor's invitation only.

Competition Robotics (0.5 credit, full year) – Competition Robotics is open to all students in grades 9-12 to introduce them to concepts in applied mathematics, engineering, and computer programming. Participation requires attendance after school and on Saturdays from September through late March. Students plan/design and build a robot, then program it to perform autonomous and user-controlled tasks. Students will compete against teams from across the state in challenges created by the Robotics Education Foundation and VEX Robotics. Teams have the opportunity to qualify for state and world championship events. Robotics helps students to develop skills in collaboration, communication, creativity, and critical thinking.

Mock Trial (0.5 credit, October – March) – Mock Trial is open to all students in grades 9-12 to introduce them to the American legal system, generally, and to the jury trial experience, in particular. Students study, under the supervision and guidance of practicing attorneys, a hypothetical case file, analyze the relevant legal and factual details, and work together to construct and present live jury trials as the attorneys and/or   witnesses. Teams have the opportunity to compete in January and February against other high school teams from throughout the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and to qualify for district, regional, and state championship events. Mock trial helps students to develop skills in public speaking, acting, persuasive argument, spontaneity, critical thinking, and working with teammates to accomplish a major goal. Many colleges and universities also have mock trial teams, as do most law schools, so the skills developed in this course can be continued through the students' higher education, whether or not they pursue a legal career.
 

Guidance and Student Support Course Descriptions

Guidance and Student Support

Freshman Seminar (Required, 0.1 credit) - A one semester course for all 9th grade students, the Freshman Seminar will help students lay a solid foundation for high school by reinforcing executive functioning skills, study skills, and learning how to prepare for college. Students will use their Naviance accounts to research colleges, careers and learning strengths. Students will also write a basic introductory resume. The seminar is required of all 9th grade students and is graded as a pass/fail course.

Career Stewardship Seminar (Required for 11th grade students, 0.2 credit) - In this course, the focus will be upon decision-making and life and college planning topics such as God's will for your life, choosing a major, career and personality assessment, resume′ building, interviewing, college searching and planning, financial stewardship, scholarships and financial aid, the SAT and ACT and other related topics. We will also be reviewing a book entitled How to Stay a Christian in College. Students will work in their Naviance accounts extensively during this course.

Resource Room (no credit) - Resource Room is scheduled in place of study halls, and meets for a minimum of two or as many as four periods per week. Individualized or small group instruction is given in executive functions, note-taking, and study skills. Students are assisted through reinforcement of new concepts, re-teaching of material, and strengthening of academic skills in areas such as reading, spelling, math, and written expression. Students receive help with establishing short- and long-term goals, planning for long-term assignments, test preparation and organization of time and materials. The goal of the resource room is for each student to achieve independence and success in the classroom setting. This is a contracted service which is available at an additional cost. For more information about the resource room, contact Student Support Services at 610-353-6522, ext. 2147 or jpuckett@dccs.org.

Physical Education/Health Course Descriptions

Physical Education/Health

All students must successfully complete 1 credit of Physical Education and 0.25 credit of Health Education to earn a diploma from Delaware County Christian School.

Physical Education (0.5 credit, full year) - The purpose of this course is to encourage, enable, and empower students to be good stewards of their physical bodies. This is accomplished primarily by providing students with the opportunity to learn the skills, knowledge, and strategies necessary to participate in a variety of team sports, individual sports, strength/speed/agility events, and lifetime fitness activities. Students will be challenged to form healthy lifestyle habits by participating in physical fitness activities outside of the classroom. Special emphasis is placed on exploring the healthy benefits of regular physical activity as well as developing a Christian perspective on stewardship of the body, character, and personal discipline as it relates to physical activity.

DC Athletics - Participation on DC's Interscholastic sports teams allows a student to earn 0.5 Physical Education credit per season of participation. To satisfy the credit requirement, students would have to participate in two (2) sports seasons throughout their high school career. Enrollment in the above Physical Education course is encouraged for all freshman and sophomore students who are unsure of their ability to participate on DC's athletic teams.

Health (Graduation requirement) (0.25 credit) - The DC Health curriculum is designed to address both the personal and interpersonal aspects of health. Specifically, the purpose of this course of study is threefold: 1) to develop an awareness of health as a combination of physical, social, emotional, and spiritual factors; 2) to develop an understanding of the importance of healthful lifestyle practices and provide practical information for implementing these practices; and 3) to encourage students to view their bodies as temples of God's Holy Spirit and to make lifestyle decisions based on biblical principles. Upper school Health units are taught in four contexts: Chapel, Advisory, Career Stewardship, and PE/Athletics. The philosophy behind this structure is that opportunities for small group discussions, gender-specific conversations, and annual reiteration of certain topics benefit students. Units of study include dimensions on health, healthy relationships/sexual abuse, nutrition, fitness, mental/emotional health (including suicide prevention), decision-making skills, drugs, and communicable diseases/STDs.

SAIL

The Schools for Applied and Innovative Learning (SAIL) are designed to build on DC’s liberal arts educational framework. SAIL is comprised of three schools: The School of Arts, the School of Humanities and Entrepreneurship, and the School of STEM. The courses offered in each of these schools emphasize meaningful risk-taking, collaboration, and communication through an interdisciplinary, product-based learning experience.

In the Upper School, SAIL follows a trimester model, in which students will take one SAIL course per trimester, meeting for a two-hour block every Wednesday. The two-hour blocks give teachers and students the time they need to follow an idea, discussion, or experiment from start to finish. Upper School students will choose from over 40 courses, which may make deciding difficult!

We encourage students to consider which courses will serve as a good fit, an appropriate challenge, and a meaningful risk for their interests and passions. For example, students interested in investigating the mathematics behind encoding and decoding secret messages may find The Mathematics of Secrets to be intriguing and could spark a passion for cryptography. Or, for those who enjoy politics, history, and drama, Historical Perspectives on Contemporary Issues invites students to take on the role of an historical character at a dinner party, where they and other guests - vastly different from themselves - discuss current political issues based on their character's point of view. And for students fascinated by the intersection of "up-cycling," materials science, and sculptures, Found Objects Metal Sculpture Workshop provides the opportunity to manipulate copper, wire, and stained-glass elements in conjunction with found-objects in order to create unique 3D sculptures based on the work on Alexander Calder.

These courses provide a superb complement to our core liberal arts courses, and an exciting learning opportunity for DC students!
 

Upper School SAIL Course Descriptions

School for the Arts

SAIL School for the Arts

The Art of Instrumental Practice (9-12) - Students who have already invested in learning how to play and who desire to be able to spend school time using and improving their skill will learn how to effectively practice and will have opportunity to practice during this class. Subjects covered will include: Identifying practice projects; using games to solve practice problems; developing an inner dialogue that promotes positive practice; focusing on fundamentals to improve music facility; applying music theory knowledge to practice; setting practice goals and working toward them; developing a healthy physical approach to practice, discovering the means to making beautiful music...even while practicing, listening to performances as an aid to practice and musical growth and preparing music for public performance--understanding your audience.
Students may be required to purchase sheet music; Qualifications for this course may be dependent on the instrument that a student plays--contact Mrs. Limpert for details.
Product: Students will have the opportunity to apply what they learn in a practice session during classroom time. Student projects may include preparation for District Band/Orchestra auditions, other auditions, preparing a solo or chamber performance, or learning concert band music they would otherwise be unable to perform.

Black and White Photography (10-12) - This course is designed to introduce the student to the basics of picture taking, picture making and the history of this art form. The course will include camera design (knowledge and operation), camera exposure (aperture and shutter), processing and printing black and white film and paper, applying elements of composition/art, and preparing a portfolio of photographs. Students will be provided with a 35 mm camera by the school.
This course requires a $75 fee for paper and film supplies.
Product: Students will create photos and statements to be displayed in an art show, on websites, and in an art journal.

Digital Photography I (9-12) - This introduction to photography course stresses the photographic image as a significant visual statement. Through the work done on various assignments, students learn how to make effective compositions that are expressive and meaningful. We will make photomontages and straight color prints.
Students are required to have an SLR digital camera that has access to manual controls and the ability to produce raw files.
Product: Students will end this course with a portfolio of images using a variety of composition and lighting techniques, as well as more advanced photoshop elements discussed in the course.

Digital Photography II (9-12) - In this second-level course, students will continue to improve their compositions and expression through this digital medium.
Students are required to have an SLR digital camera that has access to manual controls and the ability to produce raw files. Students in this class must have successfully completed Digital Photography I.
Product: Students will end this course with a portfolio of images using a variety of composition and lighting techniques, as well as more advanced photoshop elements discussed in the course.

Digital Printmaking (9-12) - Students will learn how to create sketches, carved linoleum blocks and "perfect" prints using relief printmaking techniques that are based on digital imagery using their chromebooks. Students will take digital photographs and then manipulate them so that they may be utilized for their linoleum blocks. Students will study the works of master printmakers (including some current printmakers) and form their own pieces based on their technique. Students will discover what it means to be an established Christian artist in a secular society and how to find ways to bring light to a darkened world through imagery in printmaking. Students will be encouraged to portray images that can positively influence the world around them through printmaking.
Product: Students will learn to create intricate linoleum carvings that break the normal printmaking barriers as they print on paper, fabric, leaves, etc.

Easel Painting I-IV (9-12) - Using oils and acrylics while seated at an easel, students will learn a correct approach to executing with paint on a canvas. The study of style and use of color and tools such as a palette knife will inform future decision making in building portfolio-ready work. Students will be challenged to write about their pieces as a way to further their perspective as an artist.
Students in Easel Painting must be concurrently registered in SLA Fine Art and levels II-IV require approval of Mrs. Unger.
Product: Students will create their own artwork.

Found Objects Metal Sculpture Workshop (9-12) - Students will learn to manipulate copper, wire, and stained-glass elements in conjunction with found-objects in order to create unique 3D sculptures based on the work of Alexander Calder. Students will discuss the ever-increasing need to reuse or "up-cycle" as artists so as to have a positive impact on the environment. Students will learn basic sawing, form-folding, cold connections, and soldering using copper and mixed metals. Students will be encouraged to find unused or discarded materials that can be made into something pleasing to the eye. Students will also discuss the physics of sculpture and how to balance things proportionally so as to form a self-sustaining piece of artwork.
This course requires a supplies fee of $10.
Product: Students will create sawed and torched metal elements, copper and mixed-media mobile, and metal sculptures.

Graphic Design I (10-12) - This course serves as an introduction to visual principles as the basis of graphic design communication and to elements and issues of visual language. Students will experience the manipulation of graphic form to convey meaning, strategies for idea generation and development of unique concepts, and the designer's role as visual storyteller. Students will focus on marketing and logo design using Photoshop and In-Design.
Product: Students will create logos, company posters, self-portraits, and packaging.

Graphic Design II (10-12) - In the digital age where we are increasingly bombarded by media and advertisements, students will increase their awareness of how a message can be packaged and "sold" to an audience via typography, color theory elements and imagery. The themes of omnipresence and point-of-view will be explored as students learn ways to produce a successful advertisement in an appropriate manner--avoiding the need for worldly themes in advertising using the Adobe Suite.
Students in this class must have successfully completed Graphic Design I.
Product: Students will create logos, DC campaigns, packaging, and explorative projects in Photoshop.

Internship (12, once during high school) - Students may choose to participate in an internship at a location of their choice. Students will be required to participate in full-group sessions on the campus of DC to prepare them for the professional workplace. Similarly, students will be given internship-specific readings and blogs.
Product: Students will complete a project created by the internship supervisor.

Introduction to Music Theory And Sight Singing (9-12) - In keeping with our Core Values of excellence, scholarship, and impact, all DC musicians must possess the basic music literacy skill to approach all music learning through reading music notation, score analysis,  and musical and textual interpretation. The goal of this course is to develop independent musicianship through music literacy.  Vocal music students will utilize their ability to read and perform. Student instrumentalists will learn the basic principles of form and analysis to enhance their performing skills for ensemble playing, solo playing, and church ministry. Students enrolling in Concert Choir may be required to take this course concurrently with Concert Choir and must make adequate progress in this course to perform with the choir.
This course requires a supplies fee of $10.
Product: Students will participate in a Christmas Carol Project and weekly performances.

Knight Tones: Singing with Understanding (9-12, by audition only) -  Knight Tones, DC's most elite choral ensemble will continue to pursue choral excellence while delving more deeply into biblical context, history, linguistics, culture and literary study related to their current repertoire. Through research, 'think tanking' and creative practical application, Knight Tones will make informed decisions on stylistic performance practices and musical interpretation. Knight Tones is a full year commitment; it will meet during the SAIL slot for one trimester and other times during the other trimesters.
Students may need to bring money to buy lunch on occasional days.
Product: Students will participate in multiple performances.

 

Music Technology Workshop (10-12) - This course will look at the history of electronic music starting around 1950 to present day (early experimental through current popular music). This course will also provide students an opportunity to create electronic sounds/music using various methods, software, and approaches. Among topics discussed are timbre, synthesis, loops, formal structure, and listening. Each class we will address a new topic (genre, technology, approach, aesthetic, etc.). A small etude will be assigned each week in which the student will respond to this weekly topic with a creation of their own to be presented the following week.
An ability to read or play music is NOT a requirement for this course. 
Product: Students will work on a final project incorporating one or more of the approaches discussed in the course. Students will “workshop” their final project over several classes with guided feedback from classmates. Students will present their final creations at the end.

Musical Theatre Dance (9-12) - This course is designed to introduce students to the three primary ways in which dance is integrated into the Broadway musical: moving the story forward, developing character, and pure entertainment. Beginning in the 1930's and ending with the present day, each week students will learn the style of dance for a specific musical, gaining an awareness of not only the integration of dance to that show, but also understanding its importance to the culture in which it premiered. Every class will include a Lyrical Jazz warm up followed by working on choreography from the musical discussed. Students will be given opportunities to develop their own musical theatre choreography, working individually or in groups to take the technique learned in class and develop original work.
Product: Students will do a performance or create a presentation of theatre choreography learned/created in class.

Studio Art 2D I-IV (9-12- Using the mediums of pencil, conte, charcoal, tempera, watercolor, and gouache, students will be given the opportunity, through set projects, to explore the strengths of each medium and build a unique portfolio. Guest artists will feature their work in set demonstrations every few weeks. This course may be taken multiple times throughout high school. Preference will be given to students developing portfolios for college admission.
Students in Studio Art 2D I-IV must be concurrently registered in SLA: Fine Art and levels II-IV require approval of Mrs. Unger.
Product: Students will create artwork to be displayed in an art show and annual arts publication.

Studio Art 3D I-IV (9-12) - This course involves developing students' decision-making in their use of the elements and principles of art as they relate to the integration of depth, space, volume, and surface, either actual or virtual (paraphrased from the College Board). This course may be taken multiple times throughout high school. Preference will be given to students developing portfolios for college admission. Students in Studio Art 3D I-IV must be concurrently registered in SLA and levels II-IV require approval of Mrs. Unger.
Product: Students will create artwork to be displayed in an art show and annual arts publication.

Theatre Intensive: Character Development (9-12) - This course is designed for students who desire to dive deep into the art of developing a character through various acting techniques. Students will study the methods of numerous acting teachers, explore their strategies, and apply them to scene work from varying genres.
Product: Each student will prepare one scene or monologue, using a technique studied, to be performed in a showcase at the end of the course.

Yearbook (9-12) - This course works in combination with the regular “yearbook”  class to create the yearbook. This includes using e-design and photoshop, learning design and incorporating a  theme, practicing principles of good photography, interviewing, as well as headline and caption writing. Students will be responsible for assigned spreads, designing them and completing them through the editing process. 
Unless exception is granted by teachers, students taking this class must be enrolled in SLA: Yearbook
Product: Students will work together to produce the hardbound volume that captures the people and events of the school year through applying thoughtful design and accurate writing. 

School for Humanities and Entrepreneurship

SAIL School for Humanities and Entrepreneurship


Adulting 101 (10-12) - Picture this: It's a beautiful spring day and you've just received your (very expensive) college diploma. Your mother is crying and your dad is wishing you a hearty "congratulations." The rest of the day is spent celebrating you! The next morning you open your eye and realize the time for "adulting" has come...and you have no idea what that means! FEAR NOT! In this SAIL course, you will be prepared for that inevitable day. Learn some of the essential skills you need to feel prepared for life after college: communication, budgeting, car upkeep, interviewing, sewing, etc. Skills that will not only help you function in the real world, but that will equip you to serve others as Christ calls us.
Product: Students will create an instruction manual comprised of the skills they've learned throughout the course, as well as additional skills they will research and present.

The Case for Life (10-12) - Few issues divide Americans more than the topic of abortion. Often our understanding (and discussions) of this hot topic takes place through headlines and just 140 characters. Students in this class will spend the trimester seeing this complex topic from a dozen different vantage points: biology, law, race, economics, history, and more. The goal is to help us understand human beings better, develop integrity in our thinking about abortion, and develop our ability to communicate a persuasive message of truth in such a divisive age. We will spend our time delving into each of these related disciplines and giving each group of students time to work on their presentation on one mini-topic.
Product: Students will prepare presentations on the disciplines most pertinent to understanding the issue of abortion. Topics of presentations will include things like the biology of a baby in the womb, biblical and philosophical arguments for and against abortion, American and global abortion laws, introducing us to the women who get abortions and why they get them, race and abortion, the economics of abortion, historical views of abortion and more. We will invite a keynote speaker (such as Scott Klusendorf) to present on this topic and students will present on their topics in breakout sessions followed by Q&A portions. This event will take place one evening on the DC Upper Campus for the purpose of helping people better understand the various disciplines related to the topic of abortion in order to develop a more biblical view of life and help equip people to make a biblical case for life.

The Changing Face of Children's Literature (9-12) - Students will take a whirlwind tour of the history of children's literature, from the earliest folktales to current selections. An in-depth look at the changing purposes, topics and themes of children's books will form the backbone of our study. Elements of excellent children's literature will be gleaned and incorporated into the composition of a variety of children's stories which the students will author in small groups, pairs and individually.
Product: Each student will author an original children's picture book which will be shared with a small group of students at our elementary campus.

Detective Fiction (10-12) - This course will challenge students in critical thinking and logic skills as they are introduced to detective genre conventions. Students will be introduced to a variety of writers from Poe, the founder of detective fiction, to the classic Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, to Chesterton and Sayers, the Christian detective writers, to the more modern such as Ellery Queen and Agatha Christie. The genre will also be explored in film, ranging from vintage movie classics to present day television series. Finally, the student will practice writing, utilizing the conventions of the genre as he models some of the writers we've studied.
Product: Students will create a detective story, using the conventions studied in class.

Dystopian Fiction (10-12) - Through the examination of Dystopian fiction, students will explore and discuss questions such as: How far is too far? Who is capable of creating life? What makes a human human? When and how should we speak out against injustice? Students will be examining these questions from a Christian perspective as well as competing, false perspectives.
Product: Students will write their own original short stories, incorporating various dystopian themes we discuss throughout the course.

Harvard Model Congress (9-12) - This course will focus heavily on Congress and to a lesser extent the entire United States government. The students will be taking on the role of a certain senator/house member and will be discussing/debating key issues in class. The instruction will walk the students through the process of Congressional bill writing, debates, proposals and strategies throughout the year.
A fee of $700 required for travel and registration at Harvard Model Congress in Boston.
Product: The students will take a field trip to Harvard during the course. The students will have pre-assigned roles and committees. High school students from all across the country will be at the same conference (which is run by Harvard students) and will be participating in debate, bill creation, proposals, etc. The instructor will evaluate the effort and skill of the students while at Harvard in order to evaluate their final product.

Historical Perspectives on Contemporary Issues (9-12) - As the dinner party began, Ghenghis Khan munched loudly on fried haggis, a new recipe straight from Edinburgh, as he analyzed the other guests making their entrance. Elizabeth II, the royal host, was greeting a man in a black suit named Dr. King and a man wearing some sort of white bed sheet and a crown of leaves around his head. He overheard that this man, Julius, was known for military conquests in France. Genghis stuffed more haggis into his mouth with his hands and laughed out loud with a grunt: "This guy?! Doesn't look like a warrior at all."

Students will closely study individuals in history that had unique personalities, opinions and worldviews. This sense of biography will be presented in a portfolio and applied as students arrive to various dinner parties as their character. Once at the social event, students will discuss current political issues with other guests in attendance based on their character's point of view. Students are expected to act with passion and articulate particular perspectives clearly as they interact with people drastically different than themselves. Characters will range from a variety of time periods in world history.

Julius Caesar critically looked this barbarian up and down and rolled his eyes. This man has no sense for culture; Rome would never accept him. Elizabeth II interrupted his thoughts as she asked, "Ghengis and Julius, what are your thoughts on Vladimir Putin reclaiming the Crimea for the Russian Federation?" As the two competed for the best military analysis, Martin, who has a passion for non-violence, took a long deep breath. It was going to be an evening to remember.
Product: Product: Students will participate in multiple feasts with numerous historical characters attending.

History and Hollywood (9-12) - You have just finished watching Pocahontas and wonder if your pet rock really has a spirit. You quickly google search the life of Pocahontas and discover John Smith doesn't end up marrying her and she can't paint with all the colors of the wind (sorry for the spoilers). Hollywood often uses historical content to create fantastic movies, but the true historical content is typically hidden beneath the artistic additions of Hollywood. This course explores how historical content has been used in a variety of Hollywood movies and whether or not it is ethical to change the historic truth for the sake of making a modern exciting movie.
Product: Students will have the chance to select a Hollywood movie that portrays a historic event and "fix" it to be accurate by filming a new scene for the movie. Students may also choose to research a historic event or person and craft a script and film a scene for his/her historical movie.

The Holocaust (9-12) - This course will consist of an intensive study of the time period of the Holocaust through interviews with survivors in person and with videoconferencing.  We will read the well-regarded book, Ordinary Men and consider the main roles people were involved in of perpetrator, victim, bystander or rescuer. In addition we will examine the conditions that led to this unique period of history and compare that to conditions in history today.

Internship (12, once during high school) - Students may choose to participate in an internship at a location of their choice. Students will be required to participate in full-group sessions on the campus of DC to prepare them for the professional workplace. Similarly, students will be given internship-specific readings and blogs.
Product: Students will complete a project created by internship supervisor.

Psychology and Children's Television (9-12) - This course will examine the huge impact children's television has on learning and culture. In doing so, we will examine the psychology behind much of the writing, execution and content seen in children's television programming. The students will watch episodes of these shows in class, and the teacher will lead a discussion about the message received, the psychological factors in play, and the effectiveness of the message.
Product: Students will create a pilot episode for their own children's television show. The episode will be a collaborative effort, with the students taking separate roles in crafting their pilot episode. The episode must deal with cultural/social/psychological subject matter, and they will 'pitch' their pilot to their fellow students in an attempt to get the series greenlit.

Questions in Psychology (11-12) - Students in this course will acquaint themselves with some of the major psychological studies of the 20th and 21st centuries.  Through investigating the way these studies were conducted, students will learn the proper ways to conduct their own experiments.  Students will explore topics of interest to them and then they will hypothesize, control for confounding variables, establish control groups, and finally proceed with their uniquely designed experiment.  The results of their findings will be presented to the class at the conclusion of the class.
Students must be enrolled in SLA: AP Psychology.
Product: Students will design an original psychology experiment that follows a professional study model.

Revelation for Today: Let the Reader Understand (9-12) - If "All Scripture is God-Breathed" then why do many Christians today only read from Psalms, the Gospels and Paul's letters? What about the more difficult books of the Bible like Revelation? This class is designed to probe what some consider to be one of the more difficult books of the Bible. However, by the end, it is hoped that students will see it as a highly practical and understandable book. As we explore the hermenuetics, interpretation and meaning within John's vision. Students will keep a journal as they work through Scripture between weekly classes, and come prepared to talk about an assigned passage in the next class. We will also consider basic and intermediate Bible study tools and tips so that they will be better prepared to tackle other "difficult passages" on their own.
Product: Students will produce a comprehensive notebook with their findings on how they incorporated the various goals of SAIL learned in the course.

Rhetoric, Historic Speeches, and Worldview (9th Grade Required) - When commenting on the eloquence of Winston Churchill, John F. Kennedy said, “he mobilized the English language and sent it into battle.” This class seeks to prepare students to “mobilize” and “send” language winsomely and effectively as they understand the “wonder of words” and develop their own delivery of speeches. The student will be introduced to the skills of rhetoric and eloquence by reading, analyzing, and delivering parts of key speeches throughout human history.  An aim of the class, as we examine and learn to deliver these speeches, is that the student realizes the importance of language and skillful communication as something that is to be done in submission to our Creator.
Product: Students will deliver a declamation speech.

Shop Class as Soulcraft: Why We Make Things and Why it Matters (10-12, requires an application) - This course will explore the philosophy of craftsmanship and the value of producing and creating physical things. To this end, students will be restoring or rebuilding a physical object (a piece of furniture, bike, or motorcycle). A primary goal throughout the course will be to understand that human beings are creators/makers who image their Creator by producing, making, and restoring. Part of human fulfillment comes from recognizing our God-given nature as craftsmen.
Product: Students will rebuild or restore a piece of furniture, bike, or motorcycle.

The Situation Room (10-12) - Should teachers get pay raises or deductions based on student test scores? There are currently 41 capital offenses that are worthy of the death penalty - should there be more, less, or none at all? Should a fetus be considered a citizen and therefore protected by Constitutional rights, at conception? Is refusing to bake a cake for a same-sex couple, due to sincerely held religious beliefs, an example of discrimination or an example of exercising first amendment rights? As participants in the 21st century, we are confronted daily with issues that force us to examine what we believe and where we will take a stand. In "The Situation Room," students will be asked to examine multiple viewpoints surrounding standardized testing, the death penalty, abortion, and LGBTQ+ rights and work together to formulate a resolution that can be passed on to Congress, and eventually the American people. Students will work in small, collaborative groups to research each issue and present their findings. They will also participate in group discussions, hear from guest speakers, and survey their peers to aid their research.
Product: Student groups will present their final resolutions for each topic in a debate against other groups with different perspectives.

Social Entrepreneurship (9-12) - The course challenges students to recognize, develop, and act upon their potential for creativity, innovation, and entrepreneurship. By being introduced to systematic ways to more effectively find creative solutions to problems, students learn to innovate in their daily lives, and act in an entrepreneurial fashion. Entrepreneurship is approached as a mode of discerning and performing as well as outlook and an activity. Special attention is given to sustainable enterprises that serve society and business. How to reason like an entrepreneur is the substance of the course.
Product: Students will create a product/service as the culminating facet of the course.

The Supreme Court (9-12) - The Death Penalty, Abortion, Health Care, Cell Phone Privacy: the U.S. Supreme Court has heard cases on all of these topics and more in recent years, and its decisions ultimately touch the lives of all Americans. In this class we will study the Supreme Court's place in the U.S. legal system. Topics we will cover include: how a case gets to court, the role of lawyers before the court, the purpose of oral argument, media coverage of the court. We will spend time learning about each of the Supreme Court justices and their voting tendencies.
Product: Participation in an actual Supreme Court case where students will assume the roles of one of the Supreme Court justices, research the issue(s), participate in oral arguments, and make a decision.

Truth in the Gray Spaces (9-12) - The most important questions facing our world today do not have easy answers. What is the Christian's responsibility regarding racism, gender identity, sex trafficking, technology, and other pressing issues? Is Disney's entertainment raising America's children? These are gray spaces. But is there truth in the gray? In his Word, God clearly reveals biblical principles that show us His heart and guide us as we make decisions within the cultural gray spaces. If you want to learn more about cultural hot topics and want to dig into God's Word, this is a great class for you.
Product: Students will choose a "gray space" to analyze and evaluate with the class. The goal is to introduce the topic, facilitate a discussion surrounding the topic, and then present and defend a biblical philosophy of this gray space.
 

School for STEM

SAIL School for STEM


Bioinformatics and Biotechnology (10-12) - The code for life is written in DNA. Understanding how that code works, what it codes for, and what current research is being done to understand it will help shape the future of medicine and modern genetics. Students will dive into the details of DNA by comparing the DNA sequence of different species to see what makes organisms unique. There will be a heavy emphasis on laboratory techniques that are currently being used in the field of bioinformatics. Students will also learn how new discoveries are communicated to other researchers by looking at research papers, grant writing, and the funding of research. Students who are interested in research in the biological fields or a career in medicine will benefit from this course.
Product: Students will look at individual DNA and see how it relates to history and health.

Comparative Zoology (10-12) - Comparative Zoology is a class dedicated to the study of advancements in animal autonomy. Moving outward from less "advanced," "simpler" organisms, toward more "advanced" organisms, students will get to dissect and learn about the internal anatomy of organisms that allow them to thrive in their native ecosystem. This class will be dissection heavy with the opportunity to dissect "simpler" organisms such as worms and crayfish, along with the more "advanced" ones such as sharks and pigs. The goal of the course will be to better understand the relationship between form and function while also gaining an introduction to zoology.
Students in this class must have successfully completed SLA: Biology.
Product: Students will, via dissection, isolate an organ system of a fetal pig and give a creative, detailed account of how its form allows for the function of the organism.

Competition Robotics (9-12) - Competition Robotics will introduce students to concepts in applied mathematics, engineering, and computer programming. Students will plan/design and build a robot, then program it to perform autonomous and user-controlled tasks. Students will compete against teams from across the state in challenges created by the Robotics Education Foundation and VEX Robotics. Teams have the opportunity to qualify for state and world championship events. Robotics helps students to develop skills in collaboration, communication, creativity, and critical thinking. This course is designed to supplement student involvement in DC's competitive high school robotics program by providing extended time for students to collaborate, build, program, and practice with their robots as they prepare for focal and state level competitions. Students will record progress and learning in an engineering notebook.
Participation requires attendance after school and on Saturdays from September through late March. Enrolling students must demonstrate a commitment to robotics through regular attendance and productive contributions to their team.
Product: Student teams will construct a competition robot for the VEX HS Robotics Competition and document the process in an engineering notebook.

Computer Programming I (9-12) - Students will investigate the concepts of branches, subroutines, loops, stacks, arrays, graphics windows, shapes, turtle graphics, interactivity, and math.  Students will be given daily assignments where they will be asked to manipulate, improve, and change a program. At the end of the course, students will collaborate on a program to engage and interact with a certain age group. As a result of this course students will appreciate the thought that goes into computer programming.  Through the use of computer programming, students will develop a life skill and appreciation of God and His creation by using human creativity and reason.
Product: Students will collaborate on a program to engage and interact with a certain age group.

Computer Programming II (9-12) - Students will investigate the concepts of sound, program, text, clock, desktop, dictionary, imagelist, and network objects all while writing programs which incorporate shapes, responding to events, and collision detection. Students will be given daily assignments where they will be asked to manipulate, improve, and change a program. At the end of the course, students will collaborate on a program designed to engage and interact with a certain age group while incorporating animations and graphics. As a result of the course, students will appreciate the thought that goes into the computer programming. Through the use of computer programming, students will develop a life skill and appreciation of God and His creation by using human creativity and reason.
Students in this class must have successfully completed Computer Programming I.
Product: Students will collaborate on a program designed to engage and interact with a certain age group while incorporating animations and graphics.

Cosmetic Chemistry (11-12) - Students will use principles of chemistry and scientific methods to experiment with recipes for various personal-care items. In this lab-based class, students will create their own products while learning the science behind the reactions. We will then use scientific methods to improve yields or quality.
This course require a $50 supplies fee.
Product: Students will produce various cosmetics and essences for their own use.

Financial Futures (10-12) - This real life simulation course will allow students to learn about various financial decisions that have to be made at various stages of life by living through those stages. Students will learn about personal finances including credit cards, debt, insurance, savings and investments accounts, housing, investment family planning and retirement.  Students will maintain accounts for the duration of the course and have to make major financial decisions that will determine whether they will be able to retire at the end of the course. Students will become fluent in the use of Excel spreadsheets.
Preference will be given to students who are not taking SLA: Finance. Students taking the course must either be currently enrolled in or have previously completed SLA: Algebra II or SLA: Precalculus.
Product: Students will create a newsletter that captures students' experiences and what they learned in the course.

Game Theory in Real Life (101): Foundations of Business, Math and Beyond (10-12) - Popularized by the 2001 movie "A Beautiful Mind," the field of Game Theory is rooted in mathematics and examines the strategic interaction between humans and their environment. Beyond what we call 'games' in common usage (such as Chess), it explores the modeling of strategy, conflict and resolution among nations, political campaigns, competition among businesses, even every-day decisions. Game Theory is an increasingly popular college major and impacts such diverse fields as business, math, political science, and computer programming. This class will incorporate college level lectures directly from Yale and Stanford Universities, followed by class discussion and hands-on application of principles learned in that day's lecture. Students will be able to critique the tenets of Game Theory through the lens of a Christian worldview.
Product: Students will integrate concepts learned throughout the trimester in a final 2-week project that incorporates the main elements of game theory.

Internship (12, once during high school) - Students may choose to participate in an internship at a location of their choice. Students will be required to participate in full-group sessions on the campus of DC to prepare them for the professional workplace. Similarly, students will be given internship-specific readings and blogs.
Product: Students will complete a project created by internship supervisor.

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (9-12) - Do you love maps? Do you love data? Do you love software? If you answered yes to these questions, then Intro to GIS (Geographic Information Systems) is for you! GIS is a framework for gathering, managing, and analyzing data. Rooted in the science of geography, GIS integrates many types of data. It analyzes spatial location and organizes layers of information into visualizations using maps and 3D scenes.
Product: Students will collect data to enter into their maps in order to provide for a chosen need.

The Mathematics of Secrets (9-12) - Students in this course will investigate the mathematics behind encoding and decoding secret messages. The history and importance of cryptography (the process of concealing messages) will be discussed throughout the course. Students will study and apply concepts from number theory, combinatorics, statistics, and computer science to encode and decipher messages. Students will research and present their findings on the past, present, and future of cryptography. (BRX DUH UHDGB IRU WKLV FODVV!)
Students taking this course must have previously completed SLA: Geometry.
Product: Students will research and present on a historical event or person that is related to the mathematics of cryptology.

ROV@DC: Underwater Remotely Operated Vehicles (10-12) - Students will design and build underwater remotely operated vehicles (ROV) to accomplish a variety of tasks. Students will be challenged to use STEM concepts from their core courses at DC to build their ROV’s from the ground up to be deployed in marine environments. Teamwork is an essential component of this course as students will work in groups collaborating in all aspects of design and implementation of the ROV. Upon completion of this course, teams may choose to enter the Marine Advanced Technology Education (MATE) competition in the spring.  (http://pennsylvania.marinetech2.org/)
Product: Students will design and build underwater remotely operated vehicles to accomplish a variety of tasks.

Sports Management and Athletic Training (9-12) -

Sports Statistics (9-12) - The course will expose students to the many ways mathematics and statistics are used in athletics. Students will study how statistics are developed and calculated as well as how they can be misleading. The goal is to have students better understand how math is used as a decision making tool in sports.
Product: The students will produce a magazine titled Math in Sports Illustrated. The magazine will include articles on the evidence of math in sports, puzzles based on math calculations and terminology in sports, articles on the financial aspect of sports, and other key findings regarding statistics in sports.

Video Games: Impact on Culture, Society, and the Individual (9-12) - Video games as a mass medium have developed relatively recently and became a pop culture phenomenon in America soon after their inception. While many thought video games were simply a fad, their staying power over the decades has established them as one of the most popular--and profitable--forms of mass communication. Nearly every youth in America plays video games, and every form of screen--from television to computer to cell phone--is able to play games. In this course, we will focus on the critical analysis of social issues in video games--we're interested in how games affect (and are affected by) the people who play them and the culture in which they are played. We'll be learning about why people play games and how video games impact an individual's worldview. We will analyze many issues and concepts through a Biblical worldview and see what does the Bible say about video games. Students will leave with a sense of the historical role video games have played and will continue to play in global cultural production. At the end of the course each student will provide a detailed analysis of a particular game and how it relates to culture and the individual.
Product: Students will provide a detailed analysis of a particular game and how it relates to culture and the individual.


 

First page of the PDF file: 2018-2019UpperSchoolAcademicHandbook
Contact Information

Mark Dixon
Head of Upper School
610-353-6522 x2219
mdixon@dccs.org

Jim Favino
Assistant Head of Upper School
610-353-6522 x2217
jfavino@dccs.org

Elizabeth Neal
Administrative Assistant
Upper School Office
610-353-6522 x2205
eneal@dccs.org

Kim O'Bryan
Upper School Office Assistant
Attendance
610-353-6522 x2287
kobryan@dccs.org