Upper School SAIL

Schools for Applied and Innovative Learning

The Schools for Applied and Innovative Learning (SAIL) are designed to build on DC’s liberal arts educational framework. SAIL is comprised of three components: The School of Arts, the School of Humanities and Entrepreneurship, and the School of STEM. The courses offered in these schools emphasize meaningful risk-taking, collaboration, and communication through an interdisciplinary, product-based learning experience.

In the 2018-2019 school year, the Upper School will follow a trimester model, in which students will take one SAIL course per trimester, meeting for a two-hour block every Wednesday. The two-hour blocks give teachers and students the time they need to follow an idea, discussion, or experiment from start to finish. Upper School students will choose from over 50 courses, which may make deciding difficult!

We encourage students to consider which courses will provide them with a good fit, an appropriate challenge, or a meaningful risk. For example, students interested in investigating the mathematics behind encoding and decoding secret messages may find The Mathematics of Secrets to be intriguing. Or, for those who enjoy politics, history, and drama, Historical Perspectives on Contemporary Issues invites students to take on the role of an historical character at a dinner party, where they and other guests - vastly different from themselves - discuss current political issues based on their character's point of view. And for students fascinated by the intersection of "up-cycling," physics, and sculptures, Found Objects Metal Sculpture Workshop provides the opportunity to manipulate copper, wire, and stained-glass elements in conjunction with found-objects in order to create unique 3D sculptures based on the work on Alexander Calder.

These courses provide a superb complement to our core liberal arts courses, and an exciting learning opportunity for DC students!

Upper School SAIL FAQs

Upper School SAIL Course Descriptions

School for the Arts

SAIL School for the Arts

Black and White Photography I-III (10-12) - This course is designed to introduce the student to the basics of picture taking, picture making and the history of this art form. The course will include camera design (knowledge and operation), camera exposure (aperture and shutter), processing and printing black and white film and paper, applying elements of composition/art, and preparing a portfolio of photographs. Students will be provided with a 35 mm camera by the school. The course will no longer include work in the art room. This course requires a $75 fee for paper and film supplies.
Product: Students will create photos and statements to be displayed in an art show, on websites, and in an art journal.


Digital Photography I (9-12) - This introduction to photography course stresses the photographic image as a significant visual statement. Through the work done on various assignments, students learn how to make effective compositions that are expressive and meaningful. We will make photomontages and straight color prints. Students are required to have an SLR digital camera that has access to manual controls and the ability to produce raw files.

Product: Students will end this course with a portfolio of images using a variety of composition and lighting techniques, as well as more advanced photoshop elements discussed in the course.


Digital Photography II (9-12) - In this second-level course, students will continue to improve their compositions and expression through this digital medium. Students are required to have an SLR digital camera that has access to manual controls and the ability to produce raw files. Prerequisite: Digital Photography I.
Product: Students will end this course with a portfolio of images using a variety of composition and lighting techniques, as well as more advanced photoshop elements discussed in the course.


Digital Printmaking (9-12) - Students will learn how to create sketches, carved linoleum blocks and "perfect" prints using relief printmaking techniques that are based on digital imagery using their chromebooks. Students will take digital photographs and then manipulate them so that they may be utilized for their linoleum blocks. Students will study the works of master printmakers (including some current printmakers) and form their own pieces based on their technique. Students will discover what it means to be an established Christian artist in a secular society and how to find ways to bring light to a darkened world through imagery in printmaking. Students will be encouraged to portray images that can positively influence the world around them through printmaking.
Product: Students will create printed fabric and paper elements using multi-block linoleum carvings.


Easel Painting I-IV (9-12) - Using oils and acrylics while seated at an easel, students will learn a correct approach to executing with paint on a canvas. The study of style and use of color and tools such as a palette knife will inform future decision making in building portfolio-ready work. Students will be challenged to write about their pieces as a way to further their perspective as an artist. Students in Easel Painting must be concurrently registered in SLA Fine Art and levels II-IV require approval of Mrs. Unger.
Product: Students will create their own artwork.


Found Objects Metal Sculpture Workshop (9-12) - Students will learn to manipulate copper, wire, and stained-glass elements in conjunction with found-objects in order to create unique 3D sculptures based on the work of Alexander Calder. Students will discuss the ever-increasing need to reuse or "up-cycle" as artists so as to have a positive impact on the environment. Students will learn basic sawing, form-folding, cold connections, and soldering using copper and mixed metals. Students will be encouraged to find unused or discarded materials that can be made into something pleasing to the eye. Students will also discuss the physics of sculpture and how to balance things proportionally so as to form a self-sustaining piece of artwork. This course requires a supplies fee of $10.
Product: Students will create sawed and torched metal elements, copper and mixed-media mobile, and metal sculptures.


Graphic Design I (10-12) - This course serves as an introduction to visual principles as the basis of graphic design communication and to elements and issues of visual language. Students will experience the manipulation of graphic form to convey meaning, strategies for idea generation and development of unique concepts, and the designer's role as visual storyteller. Students will focus on marketing and logo design using Photoshop and In-Design.
Product: Students will create logos, company posters, self-portraits, and packaging.


Graphic Design II (10-12) - In the digital age where we are increasingly bombarded by media and advertisements, students will increase their awareness of how a message can be packaged and "sold" to an audience via typography, color theory elements and imagery. The themes of omnipresence and point-of-view will be explored as students learn ways to produce a successful advertisement in an appropriate manner--avoiding the need for worldly themes in advertising using the Adobe Suite. Students must have successfully completed Graphic Design I to enroll in this course.
Product: Students will create logos, DC campaigns, packaging, and explorative projects in Photoshop.


Internship (11-12, once during high school) - Students may choose to participate in an internship at a location of their choice. Students will be required to participate in full-group sessions on the campus of DC to prepare them for the professional workplace. Similarly, students will be given internship-specific readings and blogs.
Product: Students will complete a project created by the internship supervisor.


Introduction to Music Theory And Sight Singing (9-12) - In keeping with our Core Values of excellence, scholarship, and impact, all DC musicians must possess the basic music literacy skill to approach all music learning through reading music notation, score analysis,  and musical and textual interpretation. The goal of this course is to develop independent musicianship through music literacy.  Vocal music students will utilize their ability to read and perform. Student instrumentalists will learn the basic principles of form and analysis to enhance their performing skills for ensemble playing, solo playing, and church ministry. Students enrolling in Concert Choir may be required to take this course concurrently with Concert Choir and must make adequate progress in this course to perform with the choir. This course requires a supplies fee of $10.
Product: Students will participate in a Christmas Carol Project and weekly performances.


Knight Tones: Singing with Understanding (9-12, by audition only) -  Knight Tones, DC's most elite choral ensemble will continue to pursue choral excellence while delving more deeply into biblical context, history, linguistics, culture and literary study related to their current repertoire. Through research, 'think tanking' and creative practical application, Knight Tones will make informed decisions on stylistic performance practices and musical interpretation. Knight Tones is a full year commitment; it will meet during the SAIL slot for one trimester and other times during the other trimesters. Students may need to bring money to buy lunch on occasional days.
Product: Students will participate in multiple performances.


Musical Theatre Dance (9-12) -This course is designed to introduce students to the three primary ways in which dance is integrated into the Broadway musical: moving the story forward, developing character, and pure entertainment. Beginning in the 1930's and ending with the present day, each week students will learn the style of dance for a specific musical, gaining an awareness of not only the integration of dance to that show, but also understanding its importance to the culture in which it premiered. Every class will include a Lyrical Jazz warm up followed by working on choreography from the musical discussed. Students will be given opportunities to develop their own musical theatre choreography, working individually or in groups to take the technique learned in class and develop original work.

Product: Students will do a performance or create a presentation of theatre choreography learned/created in class.


Studio Art 2D I-IV (10-12) - Using the mediums of pencil, conte, charcoal, tempera, watercolor, and gouache, students will be given the opportunity, through set projects, to explore the strengths of each medium and build a unique portfolio. Guest artists will feature their work in set demonstrations every few weeks. This course may be taken multiple times throughout high school. Preference will be given to students developing portfolios for college admission. Students in Studio Art must be concurrently registered in a SLA Fine Art class and levels II-IV require approval of Mrs. Unger.
Product: Students will create artwork to be displayed in an Art Show and annual arts publication.


Studio Art 3D I-IV (10-12) - This course involves developing students' decision-making about how to use the elements and principles of art as they relate to the integration of depth, space, volume, and surface, either actual or virtual (paraphrased from the College Board). This course may be taken multiple times throughout high school. Preference will be given to students developing portfolios for college admission. Students in Studio Art must be concurrently registered in a SLA Fine Art class and levels II-IV require approval of Mrs. Unger.
Product: Students will create artwork to be displayed in an Art Show and annual arts publication.


Theatre Intensive: Character Development (9-12)- This course is designed for students who desire to dive deep into the art of developing a character through various acting techniques. Students will study the methods of numerous acting teachers, explore their strategies, and apply them to scene work from varying genres.
Product: Each student will prepare one scene or monologue, using a technique studied, to be performed in a showcase at the end of the course.

School for Humanities and Entrepreneurship

SAIL School for Humanities and Entrepreneurship


The Art of Reflection (9-12) - This course will focus on the student's developing his ability to express in writing, and recognize in others' writings, those lessons discovered in the process of reflection. While reading memoirs of well-known figures and the diaries/reflections of lesser known writers, studying various art and music masterpieces, and evaluating one's own reflective pieces, the student will explore the common human experience and man's search for significance.
Product: Personal journal or portfolio to include: daily journaling, gift memoir, college essay, devotional piece, poem, as will as other exercises throughout the trimester.

Building and Defending a Case: Criminal Law (9-12) - Have you ever wondered what it takes to become a lawyer? We see trails and court cases on TV, but we rarely see what happens before attorneys step into the courtroom. In this course, we will start at the beginning of a case with nothing but witness statements and exhibits; we will learn to look at a case from all angles. Teams will build a case to represent both the defense and prosecution. After a brief introduction to criminal law, objections, and courtroom etiquette, students will build and present a case to a jury. This course is NOT limited to students on the Mock Trial team. All experience levels are welcome.
Product: Students will be lawyers/witnesses representing either the defense or prosecution in a trial and present their case to a jury.

The Changing Face of Children's Literature (9-12) - Students will take a whirlwind tour of the history of children's literature, from the earliest folktales to current selections. An in-depth look at the changing purposes, topics and themes of children's books will form the backbone of our study. Elements of excellent children's literature will be gleaned and incorporated into the composition of a variety of children's stories which the students will author in small groups, pairs and individually.
Product: Each student will author an original children's picture book which will be shared with a small group of students at our elementary campus.

Diversity and Culture-Sharing (International Program Internship) (9-12) - Discussion topics include diversity, culture-sharing and culture-shaping. Students will learn to articulate the benefits and challenges of their own culture of origin. They will explore and propose ways to promote culture-sharing within the DC community. They will learn about and apply the processes of strategic planning, marketing and budgeting as part of their product development. You don't need to be an international student to sign up! Application required.
Product: Students will work with a team to plan and execute a culture-sharing event (such as Lunar New Year) for the DC community. Other events may be planned, depending on interest and number of students in the class.

The Global Refugee Crisis (9-12) - Students will explore the plight of the refugee, starting with historical events and continuing up to the present day, with significant time devoted to the refugees from Myanmar (Rohingya) and Syria. We will investigate the refugee process (what does it take for a refugee to be placed?), the refugee experience (what is it like to be a refugee?), and the Biblical response (what should the church do?).
Product: Students will provide meaningful service to a refugee community--either in our area or, if conditions permit, in the field.

Harvard Model Congress (9-12) - During this SAIL period, students will study the details of how the United States government truly works and runs... by role-playing.  Students will be assigned a specific Congressional role including background, political views and committees. The whole trimester will be spent preparing for a true Congress experience during which students will debate, deliberate, and negotiate current issues. In February 2019, we will go to Boston with hundreds of students from around the country to put our research and skills to the test. This full weekend simulation is run by Harvard undergrads to effort to teach young leaders the inner-workings of our government. Students will summarize the range of current views, persuasively articulate a stance during a speech, dialogue and rebut other policy ideas and vote on specific issues. This is a unique and engaging way to apply knowledge of government to practice.  Fee of $700 required for travel and registration at Harvard Model Congress in Boston.
Product: Students will participate in the Harvard Model Congress Government Simulation in Boston, February, 2019.

Historical Perspectives on Contemporary Issues (9-12) - As the dinner party began, Ghenghis Khan munched loudly on fried haggis, a new recipe straight from Edinburgh, as he analyzed the other guests making their entrance. Queen Victoria, the royal host, was greeting a man in a black suit named Dr. King and a man wearing some sort of white bed sheet and a crown of leaves around his head. He overheard that this man, Julius, was known for military conquests in France. Genghis stuffed more haggis into his mouth with his hands and laughed out loud with a grunt: "This guy?! Doesn't look like a warrior at all."

Students will closely study individuals in history that had unique personalities, opinions and worldviews. This sense of biography will be presented in a portfolio and applied as students arrive to various dinner parties as their character. Once at the social event, students will discuss current political issues with other guests in attendance based on their character's point of view. Students are expected to act with passion and articulate particular perspectives clearly as they interact with people drastically different than themselves. Characters will range from a variety of time periods in world history.

Julius Caesar critically looked this barbarian up and down and rolled his eyes. This man has no sense for culture; Rome would never accept him. Queen Victoria interrupted his thoughts as she asked, "Ghengis and Julius, what are your thoughts on North Korea's peace talks with South Korea?" As the two competed for the best military analysis, Martin, who has a passion for non-violence, took a long deep breath. It was going to be an evening to remember.
Product: Students will participate in multiple feasts with numerous historical characters attending.

How We Learn (9-12) - This course is designed for students who are considering a career in education or those who just want to better understand how they learn. We will consider a spectrum of learning theorists and their theories. Various teaching and learning styles will be evaluated and applied as mini-lessons are planned, prepared and performed at the lower campus.

Product: Students will develop and teach a mini-lesson to a small group of elementary students based on their own composite learning theory.

The Holocaust (9-12) - This course will consist of an intensive study of the time period of the Holocaust through interviews with survivors in person and with videoconferencing.  We will read the well-regarded book, Ordinary Men and consider the main roles people were involved in of perpetrator, victim, bystander or rescuer. In addition we will examine the conditions that led to this unique period of history and compare that to conditions in history today.

Internship (11-12, once during high school) -
Students may choose to participate in an internship at a location of their choice. Students will be required to participate in full-group sessions on the campus of DC to prepare them for the professional workplace. Similarly, students will be given internship-specific readings and blogs.
Product: Students will complete a project created by internship supervisor.

Introduction to Entrepreneurship (9-12) - The course challenges students to recognize, develop, and act upon their potential for creativity, innovation, and entrepreneurship. By being introduced to systematic ways to more effectively find creative solutions to problems, students learn to innovate in their daily lives, and act in an entrepreneurial fashion. Entrepreneurship is approached as a mode of discerning and performing as well as outlook and an activity. Special attention is given to sustainable enterprises that serve society and business. How to reason like an entrepreneur is the substance of the course.
Product: Students will create a product/service as the culminating facet of the course.

Jane Austen's World (9-12) - As we read Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice, we will focus on an in-depth study and analysis of the work as well as the culture it depicts. While exploring the novel, this class will engage in a series of activities which will also familiarize students with the customs of the day, the historic context of the work, film versions and play adaptations, and modern comparisons to Austen's wit and social criticism. As opportunity allows, we will also look into the various ways the institutions Austen satirizes appear in the present day.
Product: Students will prepare a scene from the novel in which they will enact the main tensions of the characters. They will prepare to lead a discussion after the performance.

Questions in Psychology (11-12) - Students in this course will acquaint themselves with some of the major psychological studies of the 20th and 21st centuries.  Through investigating the way these studies were conducted, students will learn the proper ways to conduct their own experiments.  Students will explore topics of interest to them and then they will hypothesize, control for confounding variables, establish control groups, and finally proceed with their uniquely designed experiment.  The results of their findings will be presented to the class at the conclusion of the class. Students must be enrolled in SLA: AP Psychology.
Product: Students will design an original psychology experiment that follows a professional study model.

Rhetoric, Historic Speeches, and Worldview (9th Grade Required) - When commenting on the eloquence of Winston Churchill, John F. Kennedy said, “he mobilized the English language and sent it into battle.” This class seeks to prepare students to “mobilize” and “send” language winsomely and effectively as they understand the “wonder of words” and develop their own delivery of speeches. The student will be introduced to the skills of rhetoric and eloquence by reading, analyzing, and delivering parts of key speeches throughout human history.  An aim of the class, as we examine and learn to deliver these speeches, is that the student realizes the importance of language and skillful communication as something that is to be done in submission to our Creator.
Product: Students will deliver a declamation speech.

The Situation Room (10-12) - Should teachers get pay raises or deductions based on student test scores? There are currently 41 capital offenses that are worthy of the death penalty - should there be more, less, or none at all? Should a fetus be considered a citizen and therefore protected by Constitutional rights, at conception? Is refusing to bake a cake for a same-sex couple, due to sincerely held religious beliefs, an example of discrimination or an example of exercising first amendment rights? As participants in the 21st century, we are confronted daily with issues that force us to examine what we believe and where we will take a stand. In "The Situation Room," students will be asked to examine multiple viewpoints surrounding standardized testing, the death penalty, abortion, and LGBTQ rights and work together to formulate a resolution that can be passed on to Congress, and eventually the American people. Students will work in small, collaborative groups to research each issue and present their findings. They will also participate in group discussions, hear from guest speakers, and survey their peers to aid their research.
Product: Student groups will present their final resolutions for each topic in a debate against other groups with different perspectives.

The Supreme Court (9-12) - The Death Penalty, Abortion, Health Care, Cell Phone Privacy: the U.S. Supreme Court has heard cases on all of these topics and more in recent years, and its decisions ultimately touch the lives of all Americans. In this class we will study the Supreme Court's place in the U.S. legal system. Topics we will cover include: how a case gets to court, the role of lawyers before the court, the purpose of oral argument, media coverage of the court. We will spend time learning about each of the Supreme Court justices and their voting tendencies.
Product: Participation in an actual Supreme Court case where students will assume the roles of one of the Supreme Court justices, research the issue(s), participate in oral arguments, and make a decision

Truth in the Gray (9-12) - The most important questions facing our world today do not have easy answers. What is the Christian's responsibility regarding racism, gender identity, sex trafficking, technology, and other pressing issues? Is Disney's entertainment raising America's children? These are gray spaces. But is there truth in the gray? Come and see as we learn how to engage in controversial discussions where truth and the gray spaces meet.
Product: Students will choose a "gray space" (not covered in class) to analyze and evaluate with the class. The goal is to introduce the topic, facilitate a discussion surrounding the topic, and then present and defend your philosophy of this gray from a biblical worldview.

Truth with a Twist (9-12) - How do you know you exist? Can you know for sure? If God is all-powerful and all-good then how can evil exist? Is it okay to lie to someone if you think you have a good reason? Why school? I'm looking for a band of students who desire to read voraciously, think critically, and discuss intelligently about Western philosophy. Why? Not only is western thought fascinating, but it has shaped how you view the world - possibly even without you realizing it. Carl Truman writes, "Only the man who knows the forces that shape the way he thinks is capable of resisting those forces." In "Truth with a Twist," we will come face to face with ourselves as we read and discuss some of the most important pages ever written in western philosophy. Furthermore, we will discern how these western philosophers have created the modern American culture of our day.
Product: Students will study one particular philosophy from our trimester and meet to discuss an ethical decision from that philosophy's perspective. Students will also analyze a modern product of American culture (Starbucks, public education system, interstate highway system, Pixar, etc.) and explain its philosophical ancestry, such as what ideas from which philosophers are most evident in that product.

School for STEM

SAIL School for STEM


Applied Sports Medicine (9-12) - This course provides students with an overview of modern athletic training, sports medicine and its history. It includes an introduction to the AT’s scope of practice: injury prevention, treatment, rehabilitation, emergency injury management and administrative functions. This course is intended to help students gain an understanding of sports medicine, various associated disciplines and the role they play in the physically active community.
Product: Students will find a specific area in Athletic Training or Sports Medicine that they find interesting. Students will then reach out to a professional in that field to determine the unique aspects of their career and the path taken to reach their position. Students will present their findings to the class.


Bioinformatics and Biotechnology (10-12) - The code for life is written in DNA. Understanding how that code works, what it codes for, and what current research is being done to understand it will help shape the future of medicine and modern genetics. Students will dive into the details of DNA by comparing the DNA sequence of different species to see what makes organisms unique. There will be a heavy emphasis on laboratory techniques that are currently being used in the field of bioinformatics. Students will also learn how new discoveries are communicated to other researchers by looking at research papers, grant writing, and the funding of research. Students who are interested in research in the biological fields or a career in medicine will benefit from this course.
Product: Students will look at individual DNA and see how it relates to history and health.


Cancer Project (10-12) - One in three Americans will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime. Students in this course will explore the myriad facets of cancer that impact cancer patients and their loved ones. Students interested in biology, medical professions, missions, marketing, and compassion care will gain a deeper understanding of the challenges of cancer and the new discoveries that are changing the way cancer is treated. Students will be challenged to discover ways to care for those affected by cancer. Students will choose a project in their area of interest, from laboratory work to awareness campaigns and working with families affected by cancer.
Product: Students will conceptually develop a new treatment or detection method for cancer. Students will present this idea to their peers as well as faculty.


Competition Robotics (9-12) - Competition Robotics will introduce students to concepts in applied mathematics, engineering, and computer programming. Students will plan/design and build a robot, then program it to perform autonomous and user-controlled tasks. Students will compete against teams from across the state in challenges created by the Robotics Education Foundation and VEX Robotics. Teams have the opportunity to qualify for state and world championship events. Robotics helps students to develop skills in collaboration, communication, creativity, and critical thinking. Participation requires attendance after school and on Saturdays from September through late March. Enrolling students must demonstrate a commitment to robotics through regular attendance and productive contributions to their team.
Product: Student teams will construct a competition robot for the VEX HS Robotics Competition and document the process in an engineering notebook.


Computer Programming I (9-12) - Students will investigate the concepts of branches, subroutines, loops, stacks, arrays, graphics windows, shapes, turtle graphics, interactivity, and math.  Students will be given daily assignments where they will be asked to manipulate, improve, and change a program. At the end of the course, students will collaborate on a program to engage and interact with a certain age group. As a result of this course students will appreciate the thought that goes into computer programming.  Through the use of computer programming, students will develop a life skill and appreciation of God and His creation by using human creativity and reason. Prerequisite: Completion of SLA: Geometry
Product: Students will collaborate on a program to engage and interact with a certain age group.


Computer Programming II (9-12; must have successfully completed Computer Programming I) - Students will investigate the concepts of sound, program, text, clock, desktop, dictionary, imagelist, and network objects all while writing programs which incorporate shapes, responding to events, and collision detection. Students will be given daily assignments where they will be asked to manipulate, improve, and change a program. At the end of the course, students will collaborate on a program designed to engage and interact with a certain age group while incorporating animations and graphics. As a result of the course, students will appreciate the thought that goes into the computer programming. Through the use of computer programming, students will develop a life skill and appreciation of God and His creation by using human creativity and reason.
Product: Students will collaborate on a program designed to engage and interact with a certain age group while incorporating animations and graphics.


Cosmetic Chemistry (11-12; must have successfully completed SLA Chemistry) - Students will use principles of chemistry and scientific methods to experiment with recipes for various personal-care items. In this lab-based class, students will create their own products while learning the science behind the reactions. We will then use scientific methods to (hopefully) improve yields or quality. This course require a $50 supplies fee.
Product: Students will produce various cosmetics and essences for their own use.


Financial Futures (9-12) - This real life simulation course will allow students to learn about various financial decisions that have to be made at various stages of life by living through those stages. Students will learn about personal finances including credit cards, debt, insurance, savings and investments accounts, housing, investment family planning and retirement.  Students will take field trips to grocery stores and will plan for the purchase of home and cars as well as for retirement. They will have to make major financial decisions that will determine whether they will be able to retire at the end of the course.  Students will become fluent in the use of Excel spreadsheets. Preference will be given to students who are not taking SLA: Finance. Students taking the course must either be currently enrolled in or have previously completed SLA: Algebra II or SLA: Precalculus.
Product: Students will create newsletters that capture their experiences and lessons learned. The product for this course will be a printed copy of the combined newsletters which will capture the key financial principles and practices taught in this course. 


Game Theory in Real Life (101): Foundations of Business, Math and Beyond (10-12) - Popularized by the 2001 movie "A Beautiful Mind," the field of Game Theory is rooted in mathematics and examines the strategic interaction between humans and their environment. Beyond what we call 'games' in common usage (such as Chess), it explores the modeling of strategy, conflict and resolution among nations, political campaigns, competition among businesses, even every-day decisions. Game Theory is an increasingly popular college major and impacts such diverse fields as business, math, political science, and computer programming. This class will incorporate college level lectures directly from Yale and Stanford Universities, followed by class discussion and hands-on application of principles learned in that day's lecture. Students will be able to critique the tenets of Game Theory through the lens of a Christian worldview.
Product: Students will produce a trimester-culminating group project demonstrating a knowledge and understanding of basic Game Theory concepts and an analysis of game theory from a Christian perspective.


Game Theory in Real Life (102): Creative Prototyping, Problem Solving, and Beyond (10-12) - Building on the foundational concepts of Game Theory  101 (required prerequisite), Game Theory 102 will incorporate lectures from several college lecture series that will focus on micro- and macroeconomics, problem solving and other areas of critical thinking. The course will end with a look at how games and game theory are impacting entrepreneurial sites such as Kickstarter and GoFundMe, and conclude with basic business and marketing concepts.
Product: Using the "Design Workshop" students will produce their own game; artistic creativity, effective teamwork and risk taking will be essential. Students will present their final project to the larger DC community.


Global Water Dilemma (9-12) - Water, one of the most plentiful, useful, and reusable minerals on earth, is an essential for life. And yet, millions of people are living without water, toilets, and hygiene. Students in this course will be challenged in their understanding of this complex problem and seek where God has equipped them to have an impact; they will be presented with the challenge of bringing clean drinking water to third world communities. In groups, students will develop their own unique solutions to this problem.
Product: Students will research current water resource and sustainability developments, promote awareness of this problem we face, and construct water filtration devices using common, inexpensive materials.


Internship (11-12, once during high school) - Students may choose to participate in an internship at a location of their choice. Students will be required to participate in full-group sessions on the campus of DC to prepare them for the professional workplace. Similarly, students will be given internship-specific readings and blogs.
Product: Students will complete a project created by internship supervisor.


The Mathematics of Secrets (9-12) - Students in this course will investigate the mathematics behind encoding and decoding secret messages. The history and importance of cryptography (the process of concealing messages) will be discussed throughout the course. Students will study and apply concepts from number theory, combinatorics, statistics, and computer science to encode and decipher messages. Students will research and present their findings on the past, present, and future of cryptography. (BRX DUH UHDGB IRU WKLV FODVV!) Students taking this course must have previously completed SLA: Geometry.
Product: Students will research and present on a historical event or person that is related to the mathematics or cryptology.

Pharmaceutical Development (11-12) - The student will gain a general understanding of how the medicines we take are developed and approved for use. The student will walk through the various processes and phases of drug development and will learn:

  • The history and function of the Food & Drug Administration
  • The definition of a drug
  • The various Phases of drug development such as: Pre-clinical, Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, and Phase 4
  • The Regulatory process from investigational new drug applications to new drug applications through to drug approval

The student will take part in development teams where the team will be assigned an indication from which they will develop a drug based on a team approach. The students will take on the roles of chemists, toxicologist, clinicians, and regulators.

The Student will also gain an understanding of the cost required to develop a drug from conception to approval and grasp the concept of return on investment and ethics.

Prerequisite: Helpful if the Student has a basic understanding of biology, chemistry, and algebra though not required.

ROV@DC: Underwater Remotely Operated Vehicles (9-12) - Students will design and build underwater remotely operated vehicles (ROV) to accomplish a variety of tasks. Students will be challenged to use STEM concepts from their core courses at DC to build their ROV’s from the ground up to be deployed in marine environments. Teamwork is an essential component of this course as students will work in groups collaborating in all aspects of design and implementation of the ROV. Upon completion of this course, teams may choose to enter the Marine Advanced Technology Education (MATE) competition in the spring.  (http://pennsylvania.marinetech2.org/)
Product: Students will design and build underwater remotely operated vehicles to accomplish a variety of tasks.


Science Olympiad (9-12) - Do you like to build or create things? Do you like to learn about science? Do you like competing with your peers? If you do then Science Olympiad is for you! Science Olympiad is an event where schools send teams of students who compete in events. There are a whole variety of different events from building hovercrafts, towers, or helicopters to identifying rocks, diseases, or animals, to bouncing lasers around a course to hit a target or solving crimes! Some events require building things ahead of time while others require preparing and learning ahead of time and being ready to perform a task or solve some mystery and prove your knowledge. For more information check out:  https://www.soinc.org/info/about-science-olympiad . In this class you will be preparing to compete in Science Olympiad with your peers.
Product: Students will design, prepare, and build various things for competitions at Science Olympiad. Students will also compete in the Science Olympiad Event.


 Contact Information

 

Mark Dixon

Head of Upper School
610-353-6522 x2219
mdixon@dccs.org

Jim Favino

Assistant Head of Upper School
610-353-6522 x2217
jfavino@dccs.org

Elizabeth Neal

Administrative Assistant
Upper School Office
610-353-6522 x2205
eneal@dccs.org


Upper Campus (grades 6-12) + Admin
462 Malin Road
Newtown Square, PA 19073

Lower Campus (Grades prek-5)
905 South Waterloo Road
Devon, PA 19333

  • 610-353-6522
  • 610-356-9684
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